Tag Archives: Woodrow Wilson

today’s holiday: Mother’s Day (United States)


Mother’s Day (United States)

The setting aside of a day each year to honor mothers was the suggestion of Anna M. Jarvis of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, whose own mother had died on May 9, 1906. She held a memorial service and asked those attending to wear white carnations—a gesture that soon became a tradition. By 1914, President Woodrow Wilson had proclaimed a national day in honor of mothers, and some people still wear carnations on the second Sunday in May—pink or red for mothers who are living and white for those who have died. More… Discuss

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this day in the yesteryear: US President Woodrow Wilson Introduces His Fourteen Points (1918)


US President Woodrow Wilson Introduces His Fourteen Points (1918)

In 1918, Wilson presented to the US Congress his Fourteen Points as a guide for a peace settlement after World War I. He emphasized “open covenants of peace, openly arrived at,” to change the usual method of secret diplomacy practiced in Europe. Wilson’s idealistic message also laid the groundwork for the creation of the League of Nations. Opposition to the points quickly developed, however, and the subsequent treaty between Germany and the Allies sowed the seeds for what conflict? More… Discuss

Special Feature: Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points



Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points
On January 8, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson addressed a hastily convened joint session of Congress, publicly stating the Fourteen Points–his idealistic plan for a world forever free from conflict. Most of Wilson’s Fourteen Points addressed specific European territorial concerns, but he also called for fair and generous treatment of Germany, absolute freedom of the seas, national boundaries determined on the basis of language, and the establishment of a general assembly of nations. When World War I ended in November 1918, Wilson personally attended the peace negotiations, believing that with his guidance, ‘peace without victory’ was possible and a new world order was at hand. What he had not counted on was the bitterness and cynicism of his allies, who had lost much. As the negotiations progressed, more and more of the Fourteen Points were sacrificed to vengeance and a grab for land. The German magazine Simplicissimus remarked on Wilson’s betrayal of his principles in June 1919 with God asking, ‘Woodrow Wilson, where are your 14 Points?’ Wilson responds, ‘Don’t get excited, Lord, we didn’t keep your Ten Commandments either!’ – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.8Ilgr56s.dpuf

today’s birthday: Woodrow Wilson (1856)


Woodrow Wilson (1856)

Wilson served as US president from 1913 to 1921, a period that spanned the country’s involvement in World War I. Following the war, Wilson hoped to achieve world peace through his “Fourteen Points,” but his progressive vision suffered numerous setbacks, and he ended his term incapacitated by a stroke. While trying to implement his plan at the Paris Peace Conference, he became the first US president to travel to Europe while in office. On what rare unit of US currency is Wilson’s image featured? More… Discuss

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev),: great compositions/performances


P. I. TchaikovskySymphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev)

this day in the yesteryear: Brandeis Sworn in as Justice of US Supreme Court (1916)


Brandeis Sworn in as Justice of US Supreme Court (1916)

Brandeis was an American lawyer and the author of the “Brandeis Brief,” a report that detailed the impact of long working hours on women and revolutionized the practice of law. He was also a leader of the American Zionist movement. Appointed to the Supreme Court by Woodrow Wilson in 1916, he served until 1939 and was the first Jew to hold that office. Brandeis University, a liberal arts university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, is named after him. Why was he called the “people’s lawyer”? More… Discuss

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