Tag Archives: major league baseball

today’s birthday: Cy Young (1867)


Cy Young (1867)

Born Denton True Young, Cy Young was an American baseball player for whom the prestigious Cy Young Award—presented annually to the best pitchers in Major League Baseball—is named. In his 22-year major league career, he pitched in 906 games. Known for his excellent control and ability to outwit batters, Young holds the record for winning the most games—511—including 76 shutouts and three no-hitters. In 1904, he pitched the American League’s first perfect game. How did Young get the nickname “Cy”? More… Discuss

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today’s birthday: Babe Ruth (1895)


Babe Ruth (1895)

George Herman Ruth, better known as Babe Ruth, was arguably the greatest player in the history of baseball. His ability to hit home runs helped turn the game into the American national pastime in the 1920s and 30s, and two of his records stood for more than 30 years. In 1936, Babe Ruth became the second player to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. What is the origin of his nickname, “Babe”? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Jim Thorpe’s Olympic Medals Posthumously Restored (1983)


Jim Thorpe’s Olympic Medals Posthumously Restored (1983)

Jim Thorpe, an American Olympian, excelled at every sport he played and is deemed one of the greatest athletes in modern sports history. He won Olympic gold medals in the pentathlon and decathlon but was stripped of his awards amid reports that he had played minor league baseball before participating in the 1912 Olympic Games. At the time, strict rules barred professional athletes from Olympic competition. What loophole enabled Thorpe’s supporters to have his medals posthumously restored? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: US President Woodrow Wilson Introduces His Fourteen Points (1918)


US President Woodrow Wilson Introduces His Fourteen Points (1918)

In 1918, Wilson presented to the US Congress his Fourteen Points as a guide for a peace settlement after World War I. He emphasized “open covenants of peace, openly arrived at,” to change the usual method of secret diplomacy practiced in Europe. Wilson’s idealistic message also laid the groundwork for the creation of the League of Nations. Opposition to the points quickly developed, however, and the subsequent treaty between Germany and the Allies sowed the seeds for what conflict? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Jackie Robinson Retires (1957)


Jackie Robinson Retires (1957)

Robinson, a vocal member of the Civil Rights movement, was the first African-American baseball player in the modern major leagues and the first African American to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1949, he led the National League in both stolen bases and batting average and was named its most valuable player. In recognition of his accomplishments both on and off the field, Major League Baseball retired Robinson’s number in 1997. How many times did he “steal home” during his career? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Baseball Game Played with Modern Rules (1846)


First Baseball Game Played with Modern Rules (1846)

The foundations of modern baseball were laid with the 1845 formulation of the “Knickerbocker Rules,” which formalized the game. According to these rules, a runner could not be sent out of play by getting hit with a thrown ball. Instead, fielders were required to tag or force the runner, as is done today. It is widely thought that the first competitive game under the new rules was played at Elysian Fields in Hoboken, New Jersey. What author of the rules is considered the “father of baseball”? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Jim Thorpe (1888)


Jim Thorpe (1888)

Thorpe was one of the most versatile athletes in modern sports. He won Olympic gold medals in the pentathlon and decathlon, starred in college and professional football, and played basketball and Major League baseball. He lost his Olympic titles, however, when it was discovered that he had played minor league baseball prior to competing, thus violating the amateur status rules. His medals were later restored to him. Legend has it that Thorpe began his athletic career in what casual way? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: JACKIE ROBINSON DAY


Jackie Robinson Day

Jackie Robinson Day is celebrated throughout Major League Baseball (MLB) in honor of Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play professional baseball in the MLB. On April 15, 1947, Robinson played his first professional game for the Brooklyn Dodgers. To commemorate Robinson’s achievements, activities are planned each year at all MLB stadiums on April 15th. Home teams coordinate activities for the tribute, which may include pre-game award presentations, special guests throwing the first pitch, prizes for fans, and appearances by other legendary baseball stars. More… Discuss

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This Day in the Yesteryear: LITTLE PERSON EDDIE GAEDEL HAS MAJOR LEAGUE DEBUT (1951)


Little Person Eddie Gaedel Has Major League Debut (1951)

At 43 inches (1.1 m) tall, Gaedel became the shortest player in the history of Major League Baseball when he made a single plate appearance for the St. Louis Browns in 1951. He arrived on the field inside a replica cake honoring the American League’s 50th anniversary, amusing the crowd by popping out of it. No one suspected his true reason for being there. Browns owner Bill Veeck—a showman fond of publicity stunts—had put Gaedel on the roster. What happened when Gaedel stepped up to the plate? More… Discuss

 

Twilight of the Elites: Chris Hayes on How the Powerful Rig the System, From Penn State to Wall St.


Twilight of the Elites: Chris Hayes on How the Powerful Rig the System, From Penn State to Wall St. (from Democracy Now)

Twilight of the Elites: Chris Hayes on How the Powerful Rig the System, From Penn State to Wall St. (from Democracy Now)   (click on th epicture to access and watch the video)

From Democracy Now: “Amidst a series of recent scandals that have rocked the global banking system, journalist Chris Hayes joins us to discuss his new book, “Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy.” The book examines how Wall Street and other major institutions — from Congress to the Catholic Church to Major League Baseball — have been crippled by corruption and incompetence. Hayes is host of the MSNBC weekend show, “Up with Chris Hayes,” and is editor-at-large of The Nation magazine. “One of the most insidious aspect of the current distribution of resources in this country, the current inequality we have, isn’t just that it is bad for people in the bottom of the social pyramid, but that it makes people at the top worse,” Hayes says. “It conditions them to be incompetent and corrupt.”