Tag Archives: Minuet

best classical music , Gustav Holst St.Paul’s Suite for String Orchestra Op.29, No.2, great compositions/performances


 

Published on Oct 18, 2014

Cross Chamber Orchestra(CCO)
Conductor : Jin Daniel Suh

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String Quintet in E Major Op. 11 #5 (Minuet) by Boccherini


String Quintet in E Major Op. 11 #5 (Minuet) by Boccherini

 

Carl Maria Von Weber: Clarinet Quintet in B flat, op. 34 , great compositions/performances


Weber: Clarinet Quintet in B flat, op. 34

STRAVINSKY – Suite Italienne: make music part of your life series



STRAVINSKY – Suite Italienne

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275: make music part of your life series


Luigi BoccheriniString Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto no. 8, in C major “Lutzow” in KV 246: make music part of your life series


Derek Han, piano. Philharmonia Orchestra, Paul Freeman.
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 8 in C major, KV 246
I. Allegro aperto
II. Andante
III. Tempo di menuetto

  • Purchase

    • Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No 8 K.246 “Lützow”, III. Rondeau. Tempo di Minuetto (iTune

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275: make music part of your life series



FROM:

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275

I Amoroso
II Allegro e con spirito
III Minuetto, trio
IV Rondeau, andante

Performed by La Magnifica Comunità

W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major Do major) (Harnoncourt): great compositions/performances


W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major (Harnoncourt)

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2012

W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788):
1. Allegro vivace, 4/4
2. Andante cantabile, 3/4 in F major
3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
4. Molto allegro, 2/2

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


[youtube.com/watch?v=CnoI-sYtCOU]

F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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make music part of your life series: Boccherini / Octet (Notturno) in G major, Op. 38 No. 4 (G. 470)


[youtube.com/watch?v=wINglWDcV8E]

Boccherini / Octet (Notturno) in G major, Op. 38 No. 4 (G. 470)

Luigi Boccherini (1743-1805)

Octet (Notturno) in G major, Op. 38 No. 4 [G. 470] (1787)

00:00 – Andante amoroso
06:41Minuetto
11:14 – Finale. Allegro vivo

Tafelmusik, dir. Jeanne Lamon (1992)

Violins – Jeanne Lamon & Ingrid Matthews
Viola – Stephen Marvin
Violoncellos – Anner Bylsma & Christina Mahler
Double bass – David Sinclair
Flute – Marten Root
Bassoon – Michael McCraw
Horn – Derek Conrod

“The Notturno [in G major] is really a chamber work for two violins, a viola, two cellos, oboe (or flute), bassoon, and horn — heard here in a nonet version with a double bass. It opens with a charming ‘Andantino amoroso ma non largo’ in an ABA form, marked with Boccherini’s pleas for grace — such as ‘con grazia’ and ‘dolcissimo e teneramente’. The work continues with a minuet with ‘reversed’ harmonies, beginning on an extended dominant seventh and resolving to the tonic. A trio and a ‘minore’ section are interspersed with the main body of the minuet in true 18th-century fashion. The finale is an ‘Allegro vivo’ in sonata form. It opens softly and then bursts out with a zest that carries through the movement. After a curious series of dotted chords that reach into the flat keys before a short pause, Boccherini leads the listener back into the merry chase in a manner worthy of Haydn at his best. The movement ends with no warning, in just the delightful spirit in which it began.” – David Montgomery

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUOR LIFE SERIES: Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)


[youtube.com/watch?v=FLlKgu1sx4s]

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)

Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Paris Bourse

Mov.I: Adagio maestoso – Allegro con brio 00:00
Mov.II: Allegretto 09:35
Mov.III: Menuetto: Vivace 13:54
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 18:04

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand’s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

Then comes a high-spirited Minuet, which, with its accented up-beats, suggests a scherzo and a popular flavor due to this low and popular gesture, and is contrasted by a graceful Ländler-like trio.

The concluding Presto in tarantella rhythm is remarkable for its bold harmonic progressions and for its wealth of dynamic contrast. This movement is in sonata form with a looser conception.

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Antonín Dvořák – Serenade in D minor, Op. 44


[youtube.com/watch?v=usvb0NRZP38]

Antonín Dvořák – Serenade in D minor, Op. 44

Nash Ensemble

Antonín Dvořák – Serenade in D minor, Op. 44
1. Moderato, alla Marcia 4’17
2. Minuetto 6’08
3. Andante con moto 8’35
4. Allegro molto 6’13

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart: Symphony No.29 – André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker(2000Live)


[youtube.com/watch?v=sXMRimMFV7M]

Mozart: Symphony No.29André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker (2000Live)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Symphony No.29 in A major, K.201
André Previn
Wiener Philharmoniker
Festspielhaus, Salzburg, 28 1/2000

The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774.[1] It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.”[2]

Structure

The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.

There are four movements:

  1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
  2. Andante, 2/4
  3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
  4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8

The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main theme.

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Great Compositions/Performances: W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788)


[youtube.com/watch?v=zK5295yEQMQ]

W. A. MozartSymphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788):
1. Allegro vivace, 4/4
2. Andante cantabile, 3/4 in F major
3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
4. Molto allegro, 2/2

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart – Symphony No 40 in G minor, K 550 – Harnoncourt


[youtube.com/watch?v=AP8trFKjpKw]
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Symphony No 40 in G minor, K 550

1. Molto allegro
2. Andante
3. Menuetto. Allegretto – Trio
4. Finale. Allegro assai

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Nikolaus Harnoncourt, conductor

Live recording, 1984

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 20 in C, K.303


[youtube.com/watch?v=9Yt97xhurk8]

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 20 in C, K.303

I. Adagio – Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Tempo di Menuetto [5:04]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

Painting of Mozart family by Johann Nepomuk della Croce

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550 Karl Bohm Wiener Philarmoniker



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550Karl Bhom conducts Wiener Philarmoniker:

 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Molto allegro 0:40
Andante 9:42
Menuetto, allegretto 17:25
Finale, allegro assai 22:05

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.[1]

 

 

 

 

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Great Composition/Performances: Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players



Great Composition/Performances:   Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827) 

Work: Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 

01. Adagio molto – Allegro con brio
02. Andante cantabile con moto
03. Menuetto – Allegro molto e vivace
04. Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace

Dedication to Baron Gottfried van Swieten
Premiered on April 2, 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Conductor: Roger Norrington
The London Classical Players

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, was dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten, an early patron of the composer. The piece was published in 1801 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel of Leipzig. It is unknown exactly when Beethoven finished writing this work, but sketches of the finale were found from 1795.[1]
Historical background

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, three years after the premiere of his 1st Symphony.

The symphony is clearly indebted to Beethoven’s predecessors, particularly his teacher Joseph Haydn as well as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but nonetheless has characteristics that mark it uniquely as Beethoven’s work, notably the frequent use of sforzandi and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. Sketches for the finale are found among the exercises Beethoven wrote while studying counterpoint underJohann Georg Albrechtsberger in the spring of 1797.

The premiere took place on 2 April 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. The concert program also included his Septet and Piano Concerto No. 2, as well as a symphony by Mozart, and an aria and a duet from Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. This concert effectively served to announce Beethoven’s talents to Vienna.[2]

Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

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Great Composers/Compositions: Mozart – Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201



The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774. It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.” The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.
There are four movements:
1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto: Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8
The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main them

 

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Antonín Dvořák – From the Bohemian Forest, Op. 68


Published on Sep 23, 2012

Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano

Antonín Dvořák – From the Bohemian Forest, Op. 68

  • In the Spinning Room,  Allegro molto [D major] 
  • By the Black Lake,  Lento [F sharp minor/major] 
  • Walpurgis Night,  Molto vivace [B falt major] 
  • In Wait,  Allegro comodo [F major
  • Silent Woods,  Lento e molto cantabile [D flat major
  • From Troubled Times,  Allegro con fuoco [A minor]

 

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J. Haydn – Symphony No. 6 in D major ‘La Matin’



Composer: Joseph Haydn (1732 – 1809).
Symphony No. 6 in D major Hob I/6 (1762):

1. Adagio-Allegro: 0:00
2. Adagio-Andante-Adagio: 5:46
3. Menuet & Trio: 13:38
4. Finale, Allegro: 18:10

By The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Flute Quartet #4 in A K 298



The Flute Quartet No. 4 in A major, K. 298, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is Mozart’s final composition for flute quartet. Unlike the previous three quartets, written for the flutist Ferdinand De Jean, the Quartet in A is believed to have been written for recreational purposes, as opposed to on commission. The low Köchel number is misleading. The work is thought to have been written sometime in 1786 or 1787, only a few years before the composer’s death.
It is in three movements:
1. Andante, Theme and variations
2. Menuetto, D major, 3/4
3. Rondeau: [Allegretto grazioso], 2/4
The third movement is notable for its almost humorously detailed tempo indication: “Rondieaoux: Allegretto grazioso, ma non troppo presto, pero non troppo adagio. Così-così—non molto garbo ed espressione” (or, translated, “A joke rondo: Allegretto grazioso, but not too fast, nor too slow. So-so—with great elegance and expression”).
A typical performance lasts about 11 minutes.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/

 

Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only minor key symphonies Mozart wrote. The 40th Symphony was completed on 25 July 1788. The composition occupied an exceptionally productive period of just a few weeks in 1788, during which time he also completed the 39th and 41st symphonies (26 June and 10 August, respectively). The symphony is scored (in its revised version) for flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, and strings. Notably missing are trumpets and timpani.
The work is in four movements, in the usual arrangement (fast movement, slow movement, minuet, fast movement) for a classical-style symphony:
1. Molto allegro, 2/2
2. Andante, 6/8
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Finale. Allegro assai, 2/2.
Every movement but the third is in sonata form; the minuet and trio are in the usual ternary form. This work has elicited varying interpretations from critics. Robert Schumann regarded it as possessing “Grecian lightness and grace”. Donald Francis Tovey saw in it the character of opera buffa. Almost certainly, however, the most common perception today is that the symphony is tragic in tone and intensely emotional; for example, Charles Rosen (in The Classical Style) has called the symphony “a work of passion, violence, and grief.”
Although interpretations differ, the symphony is unquestionably one of Mozart’s most greatly admired works, and it is frequently performed and recorded. Ludwig van Beethoven knew the symphony well, copying out 29 measures from the score in one of his sketchbooks. It is thought that the opening theme of the last movement may have inspired Beethoven in composing the third movement of his Fifth Symphony
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

Bizet / Herbert von Karajan, 1958: L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2 – Intermezzo, Minuet, Farandole



Herbert von Karajan (1908-1989) leads the Philharmonia Orchestra in this 1958 recording of the Intermezzo, Minuet and Farandole from the L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued in 1958 on the Angel label, serial number S. 35618. All images in this video are taken from the LP label (3:47) and LP jacket (10:14), front and reverse. (An image of the reverse side of the jacket appears at the end of the video.)

Movement 2: Intermezzo
Movement 3: Minuet (5:17)
Movement 4: Farandole (9:23)

Movement 1: Pastorale – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-fyBs…

More from this LP:

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Prelude (1): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZKYXD…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Minuet, Allegro giocoso (2):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFo-A0…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Adagietto (3):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Axb5e…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Carillon (4): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3FJJu…

Carmen, Suite No. 1 – Prelude, Act : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iSqEy…

 

Mozart – Flute Quartet No. 4 in A, K. 298



Mozart – Flute Quartet No. 4 in A, K. 298

The Flute Quartet No. 4 in A major, K. 298, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is Mozart’s final composition for flute quartet. Unlike the previous three quartets, written for the flutist Ferdinand De Jean, the Quartet in A is believed to have been written for recreational purposes, as opposed to on commission. The low Köchel number is misleading. The work is thought to have been written sometime in 1786 or 1787, only a few years before the composer’s death.
It is in three movements:
1. Andante, Theme and variations
2. Menuetto, D major, 3/4
3. Rondeau: [Allegretto grazioso], 2/4
The third movement is notable for its almost humorously detailed tempo indication: “Rondieaoux: Allegretto grazioso, ma non troppo presto, pero non troppo adagio. Così-così—non molto garbo ed espressione” (or, translated, “A joke rondo: Allegretto grazioso, but not too fast, nor too slow. So-so—with great elegance and expression”).
A typical performance lasts about 11 minutes.

 

Schubert Symphony No 3 D major Maazel Bavarian RSO


Franz Schubert‘s Symphony No. 3 in D major, D. 200, was written between 24 May and 19 July 1815, a few months after his eighteenth birthday. The length of thissymphony is approximately 21–23 minutes. It is in four movements:

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand‘s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

 

Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 5 in E flat major



Andras Kiss, violin. Budapest Rossini Ensemble.
Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 5 in E flat major
I. Allegro vivace 00:12:00
II. Andante 00:04:54
III. Allegretto 00:03:39

 

Mozart – String Quartet No. 15 in D minor, K. 421 / K. 417b



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart‘s String Quartet No. 15 in D minor K. 421/417b, the second of the Quartets dedicated to Haydn and the only one of the set in a minor key, is believed to have been completed in 1783. The quartet is, however, undated in the autograph. It is in four movements:
1. Allegro moderato
2. Andante (F major)
3. Menuetto and Trio (the latter in D major). Allegretto
4. Allegretto ma non troppo
The first movement is characterized by a sharp contrast between the aperiodicity of the first subject group, characterized by Arnold Schoenberg as “prose-like,” and the “wholly periodic” second subject group. In the Andante and the Minuet, “normal expectations of phraseology are confounded.” The main part of the Minuet is in minuet sonata form, while “the contrasting major-mode Trio … is … almost embarrassingly lightweight on its own … [but] makes a wonderful foil to the darker character of the Minuet.” The last movement is a set of variations. 

 

Franz Schubert Piano Sonatas D557, D575, D894, András Schiff



Franz Schubert Piano Sonatas D557, D575, D894

CD4
Sonata in A flat major D557 0:0012:41
1. Allegro moderato
2. Andante
3. Allegro
Sonata in B major D575 12:4137:50
4. Allegro ma non troppo
5. Andante
6. Scherzo. Allegro – Trio
7. Allegro giusto
Sonata in G major D894 37:50
8. Molto moderato e cantabile
9. Andante
10. Menuetto: Allegro moderato – Trio
11. Allegretto 

András Schiff Piano

 

Bach Notebook for Anna Magdalena Concerto die liebe Minuet in G major, BWV114



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 † 1750)

Work: Minuet No.1 in G major (Anna Magdalena Notebook II/1), BWV Anh.114 Anna Magdalena Bach Clavier-Büchlein

 

Serenade for flute, violin and viola in D major, Op. 25 (Vienna, Cappi, 1802)



Serenade for flute, violin and viola in D major, Op. 25 (Vienna, Cappi, 1802)
[date: c. 1796]

I. Entrata (Allegro
II. Tempo ordinario d’un Minuetto 
III. Allegro molto in D minor
IV. Andante con variazioni in C major
V. Allegro scherzando e vivace
VI. Adagio
VII. Allegro vivace

 

Dvořák – Czech Suite, Op. 39


Composer: Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904)
Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

Adolf Čech conducted the first performance in Prague on May 16, 1879

I. Preludium (Pastorale)Allegro moderato
II. Polka – Allegretto grazioso
III. Sousedská (Minuetto) – Allegro giusto
IV. Romance (Romanza) – Andante con moto
V. Finale (Furiant) – Presto

 

Franz Schubert Symphonies No.4 and No.8, Avi Ostrowsky



Franz Schubert Orchestre Symphonique de Helsingborg, Avi Ostrowsky

Symphony No.4 in C minor D 417 Tragic 0:00

  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. MenuettoAllegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

Symphony No.8 in B minor D 759 Unfinished 34:40

  1. I. Allegro moderato
  2. II. Andante con moto

Symphonique de Helsingborg, 
Avi Ostrowsky Conductor

 

 

Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 3 in D major – the Wiener Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor István Kertész


Franz Schubert‘s Symphony No. 3 in D major with István Kertész and the Wiener Philharmonic Orchestra

I. Adagio maestosoAllegro con brio
II. Allegretto  

III. Menuetto. Vivace

IV. Presto vivace

 Franz Schubert‘s Symphony No. 3 in D major, D. 200, was written between 24 May and 19 July 1815, a few months after his eighteenth birthday. The length of this symphony is approximately 21–23 minutes. It is in four movements:

  • I. Adagio maestoso — Allegro con brio
  • II. Allegretto in G major
  • III. Menuetto. Vivace
  • IV. Presto vivace

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

Then comes a high-spirited Minuet, which, with its accented up-beats, suggests a scherzo and a popular flavor due to this low and popular gesture, and is contrasted by a graceful Ländler-like trio.

The concluding Presto in tarantella rhythm is remarkable for its bold harmonic progressions and for its wealth of dynamic contrast. This movement is in sonata form with a looser conception. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._3_(Schubert)

 

Conductor István Kertész (August 28, 1929 – April 16, 1973)
was a Hungarian orchestral and operatic conductor.

Kertész was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1929, the first child of Margit Muresian and Miklós Kertész. His sister, Vera, was born four years later. Miklós Kertész, born in Szécsény, Hungary into a large Jewish family, and the director of a leather-works, died of appendicitis in 1938. An energetic, intellectually gifted woman, Margit Muresian Kertész went to work to support her family. Despite strictures against women working professionally in Hungarian society during the first half of the twentieth century, Margit was steadily promoted until she ran the office where she was employed. Kertész began violin lessons at the age of six. “When I was six” he told a High Fidelity interviewer for the December 1969 issue “and started music, it was 1935 and cruel things were going on in Europe… I found my `exile’ in music, practicing the piano, the fiddle, and writing little compositions. By the time he was twelve, Kertész began to study the piano as well.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Istv%C3%A1n_Kert%C3%A9sz_(conductor)

Shubert’s symphonies never failed to touch my spirit in a unique manner. Symphony No.3 is one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever composed, youthful, full of energy, vitality and hope.