Tag Archives: Prague

this day in the yesteryear: The First Defenestration of Prague (1419)


The First Defenestration of Prague (1419)

In 1419, a mob of Czech Hussites stormed the town hall of Prague and killed several members of the town council by throwing them out of a window—an act known as “defenestration.” Spurred by discontent at the inequality between the peasants and the Church and nobility, the First Defenestration of Prague led to the prolonged Hussite Wars, which broke out shortly afterward and continued until 1436. What was the Second Defenestration of Prague? More… Discuss

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Bedrich Smetana-Overture from “The Bartered Bride” , great compositions/performances


Bedrich Smetana-Overture from “The Bartered Bride”

12 Variations – L.V.Beethoven – ‘Le nozze di Figaro: se vuol ballare’ W.A. Mozart (Violin & Piano): great compositions/performances


12 Variations – L.V.Beethoven – ‘Le nozze di FigaroW.A. Mozart (Violin & Piano)

Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi, : great compositions/performances


Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi (HD)

Mozart – La Clemenza di Tito, K.621, Overture|The London Philharmonic conducted by Andrew Davis|great composions/performances


La Clemenza di Tito, K.621, Overture

today’s birthday: Giuseppe Verdi (1813)…Angela Gheorghiu/Placido Domingo – La Traviata – Brindisi – Prague 1994: great compositions/performances


Giuseppe Verdi (1813)

Verdi is regarded as the foremost Italian composer of opera and one of the most influential opera composers of the 19th century. His works, like Il trovatore, La traviata, and Aïda, remain at the heart of the opera repertory even today, and many of his themes transcend the boundaries of the genre and have taken root in popular culture. Though the baptismal register for October 11, 1813, lists Verdi as “born yesterday,” his date of birth remains a mystery. Why is this? More… Discuss

Angela Gheorghiu/Placido Domingo – La Traviata – Brindisi – Prague 1994

Bedřich Smetana – Ma Vlast – Vltava “Moldau” – EMH Classical Music: make music part of your lifr series



from

Bedřich Smetana – Ma Vlast – Vltava “Moldau” – EMH Classical Music

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Bedřich Smetana – Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 15: make music part of your life series


make music part of your life series: Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385, “Haffner”


[youtube.com/watch?v=p3rI-nFMFZE]

Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385,  “Haffner”

Symphony No. 35 in D major, K. 385, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1782 and is also called the Haffner Symphony. It was commissioned by the Haffners, a prominent Salzburg family, for the occasion of Sigmund Haffner’s ennoblement. The Haffner Symphony should not be confused with the eight-movement Haffner Serenade, another piece Mozart wrote on commission from the same family in 1776. The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D and G, 2 trumpets in D, timpani, and strings. Mozart’s choice of key for the Haffner Symphony is an aspect that catches one’s attention. According to Cuyler, “the key of D major, which was so felicitous for the winds, served Mozart more often than any other key, even C, for his symphonies,” including the Paris (No. 31) and Prague (No. 38) symphonies. The key is also indicative of the work’s serenade origins as all of Mozart’s orchestral serenades are scored in D major. Hence, it is not surprising that the Haffner Symphony was written in the key of D major. The symphony is in four movements:
1. Allegro con spirito, 4/4
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto, 3/4
4. Presto, 2/2.
The Haffner Symphony usually runs somewhere around 20 minutes in length. A recording by George Szell with the Cleveland Orchestra (Sony SBK 46333) runs 19.11; one by Iona Brown with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Haenssler CD 94.003) is 21.09; and one by Sir Neville Marriner also with the same ensemble (Philips 420 486-2) runs 21.34.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

today’s holiday: Five-Petalled Rose Festival


Five-Petalled Rose Festival

The Festival of the Five-Petalled Rose takes place in Cesky Krumlov in the Czech Republic, which prospered during the Renaissance; today’s festival permits residents and visitors to relive the town’s past glories. Festival highlights include swordplay demonstrations, plays and street dramas, a medieval feast, a historical market, Renaissance crafts, musical entertainment, and medieval games and dances. The festival takes its name from the rose on the coat of arms of the Rosenbergs, the noble family that lived in the town castle during the late medieval and Renaissance periods. More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Antonin Dvorak “Prague waltzes”


[youtube.com/watch?v=Clkp4o4xbpM]

Antonin DvorakPrague waltzes

make music part of your life series -_-Antonin Dvorak -_ -Prague waltzes

make music part of your life series -_-Antonin Dvorak -_ -Prague waltzes

 

make music part of your life series: Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan and the Berlin Philarmonic Orchestra)


[youtube.com/watch?v=gTKsHwqaIr4]

Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan)

NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959) – Overture Bernard Herrmann Performed by: City of Prague Philharmonic/Bateman


[youtube.com/watch?v=tF-q9VVfJB8]

NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959) – Overture

Composed by: Bernard Herrmann
Performed by: City of Prague Philharmonic/Bateman

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)


[youtube.com/watch?v=qP-ymoLlKMY]

Antonin Dvorak – Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

Antonín Leopold Dvořák (September 8, 1841 — May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer. Following the nationalist example of Bedřich Smetana, Dvořák frequently employed features of the folk musics of Moravia and his native Bohemia (then parts of the Austrian Empire and now constituting the Czech Republic). Dvořák’s own style has been described as ‘the fullest recreation of a national idiom with that of the symphonic tradition, absorbing folk influences and finding effective ways of using them.’

Piano Concerto, Op. 33 (1876)

1. Allegro agitato
2. Andante sostenuto (18:09)
3. Allegro con fuoco (26:21)

Rudolf Firkušný, piano and the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by Walter Susskind.

The Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33, was the first of three concertos that Antonín Dvořák completed—it was followed by a violin concerto and then a cello concerto—and the piano concerto is probably the least known and least performed.

As the eminent music critic Harold Schonberg put it, Dvořák wrote “an attractive Piano Concerto in G minor with a rather ineffective piano part, a beautiful Violin Concerto in A minor, and a supreme Cello Concerto in B minor“.

(bartje11 totally disagrees with the eminent Harold Schonberg)

Dvořák composed his piano concerto from late August through 14 September 1876. Its autograph version contains many corrections, erasures, cuts and additions, the bulk of which were made in the piano part. The work was premiered in Prague on 24 March 1878, with the orchestra of the Prague Provisional Theatre conducted by Adolf Cech with the Czech pianist Karel Slavkovsky.

Dvořák himself realized that he had not created a piece in which the piano does battle with the orchestra, as it is not a virtuosic piece. As Dvořák wrote: “I see I am unable to write a Concerto for a virtuoso; I must think of other things.”
(bartje11: maybe not a work with obvious virtuoso fireworks, but still a very, very difficult piano part, not for the average pianist)

What Dvořák composed, instead, was a symphonic concerto in which the piano plays a leading part in the orchestra, rather than opposed to it.

In an effort to mitigate awkward passages and expand the pianist’s range of sonorities, the Czech pianist and pedagogue Vilém Kurz undertook an extensive re-writing of the solo part; the Kurz revision is frequently performed today.

The concerto was championed for many years by the noted Czech pianist Rudolf Firkušný, who played it with many different conductors and orchestras around the world before his death in 1994. Once a student of Kurz, Firkušný performed the revised solo part for much of his life, turning towards the original Dvořák score later on in his concert career.

Arranger:
Robert Keller (1828-1891)

Publisher Info.:
Breslau: J. Hainauer, n.d.(ca.1883). Plates J. 2579, 2581 H.

Copyright:
Public Domain

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“There is so much pure goodness in it”: Antonín Dvořák – Serenade for Strings in E major, Op. 22, B. 52


[youtube.com/watch?v=mDtWw0nbMbM]

Antonín DvořákSerenade for Strings in E major, Op. 22, B. 5:

“There is so much pure goodness in it”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Antonín Dvořák‘s Serenade for Strings in E major (Czech: Smyčcová serenáda E dur), Op. 22, was composed in just two weeks in May 1875. It remains one of the composer’s more popular orchestral works to this day.

Composition and premiere

1875 was a fruitful year for Dvořák, during which he wrote his Symphony No. 5, String Quintet No. 2, Piano Trio No. 1, the opera Vanda, and the Moravian Duets. These were happy times in his life. His marriage was young, and his first son had been born. For the first time in his life, he was being recognized as a composer and without fear of poverty. He received a generous stipend from a commission in Vienna, which allowed him to compose his Fifth Symphony and several chamber works as well as the Serenade.

Dvořák is said to have written the Serenade in just 12 days, from 3–14 May. The piece was premiered in Prague on 10 December 1876 by Adolf Čech and the combined orchestras of the Czech and German theatres. It was published in 1877 in the composer’s piano duet arrangement by Emanuel Starý in Prague. The score was printed two years later by Bote and Bock, Berlin.

Dvořák’s Serenade for Strings consists of five movements:

  1. Moderato
  2. Tempo di Valse
  3. Scherzo: Vivace
  4. Larghetto
  5. Finale: Allegro vivace
English: Dvořák's funeral on 5 May, 1904

English: Dvořák’s funeral on 5 May, 1904 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

With the exception of the Finale, which is in modified sonata form, each movement follows a rough A-B-A form. It is believed that Dvořák took up this small orchestral genre because it was less demanding than the symphony, but allowed for the provision of pleasure and entertainment. The piece combines cantabile style (first movement), a slow waltz (second movement), humorous high spirits (third movement), lyrical beauty (fourth movement) and exuberance (fifth movement).1

Quotes and Interpretation

 

English: Statue of Antonín Dvořák in front of ...

English: Statue of Antonín Dvořák in front of Rudolfinum in Prague, Czech Republic. Português: Praça em Praga, República Tcheca. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Serenade (Op. 22) was aptly entitled, since at least four of its five movements (the second of which was a delightful waltz) displayed an elegant touch suggestive of gracious living accompanied by ‘serenading’ in the stately home of some 18th-century aristocrat; in the finale alone did the composer discard periwig and lace cuffs, and even here the junketing, though lively, was well-bred, and in the closing moments there was a delicious return to the courtliness of the opening. Pastiche perhaps, but what excellent pastiche! Since Dvořák was as yet only on the threshold of developing an individual style, it is perhaps not surprising that this slightly uncharacteristic but extremely accomplished and enjoyable Serenade is the earliest of his compositions in which a detached listener is likely to discover enchantment.” (Gervase Hughes 1967)2

“Just like delivering good news to someone has a positive rub-off effect on the messenger, performing Dvořák’s Serenade is really a very therapeutic endeavor for performers. There is so much ‘pure goodness’ in it. Somehow even the moments which could cast a gloomy shadow — light melancholy of the Waltz, or the fragility of the opening of Larghetto — retain the wonderfully cloudless atmosphere… The remarkable thing about Dvořák’s Serenade – this ‘cloudless goodness’ is fully sufficient for sustaining meaningful communication for nearly half an hour of music.” (Misha Rachlevsky, 2000)

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Music, Food fro the Soul: Relaxing Spa Music Long Time Mix By Spavevo


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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Antonín Dvořák – Czech Suite, Op. 39


[youtube.com/watch?v=mYXlM0Mcqms]

Antonín DvořákCzech Suite, Op. 39

Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

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Historic Performances: Jacqueline du Pre plays Elgar Cello Concerto BBCSO Barbirolli (1967 Live Stereo)


[youtube.com/watch?v=1LULTpqHNU8]

Jacqueline du Pre plays Elgar Cello Concerto BBCSO Barbirolli (1967 Live Stereo)

Sir Edward Elgar
Cello Concerto in E minor Op 85

Jacqueline du Pre
BBC Symphony Orchestra
Sir John Barbirolli

00:00 Adagio – Moderato
07:48 Lento – Allegro molto
12:18 Adagio
17:40 Allegro – Moderato – Allegro, ma non troppo – Poco più lento – Adagio.

(Live Recording: 3 Jan 1967 in Prague)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Smetana, Kubelik: Ma Vlast (The Moldau, 2/6)


[youtube.com/watch?v=HVJePP3MRCY]

From:  Ma Vlast:
II: Vltava (The Moldau)

Bedrich Smetana, composer
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
Studio Recording, 1952 (Mercury Living Presence)

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Bartered Bride Blachut Cervinková Ancerl Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra 1947


[youtube.com/watch?v=iSDlIbTy5_Y&list=TL-MtFaNsE4LDiEQB1T4YjN0wYqSuNH_iQ]

Bartered Bride Prodaná nevěsta Karel Ancerl

Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra 1947

Jenik – Beno Blachut
Marenka – Ludmila Cervinková
Krusina – Ladislav Mraz
Ludmilla – Jarmila Palivcova
Micha – Josef Heriban
Hata – Vera Krilová
Vasek – Rudolf Vonásek
Kecal – Karel Kalas
Circus master – Bohumir Vich
Esmeralda – Jarmilla Pechová
Indian – Jan Soumar
Smetana

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ENTIRE US FIGURE SKATING TEAM KILLED IN PLANE CRASH (1961)


Entire US Figure Skating Team Killed in Plane Crash (1961)

February 15, 1961, was a dark day in figure skating history. On that day, 72 people, including all 18 members of the US Figure Skating team and 16 family members, coaches, and skating officials, died when their flight from New York to Brussels went down in a field just miles from its destination. A farm worker on the ground also perished. The skaters had been en route to the 1961 World Championships in Prague, Czechoslovakia. What did the event’s organizers do to honor the dead athletes? More… Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life – Series: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141


Antonín DvořákSymphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio-F major 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace poco meno mosso 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49
****The work, at approximately 40 minutes in length, is scored for an orchestra of 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A and B♭, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in D and F, 2 trumpets in C, D, and F, 3 trombonestimpani and strings***

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Title page of the score of Dvořák’s seventh symphony, with portrait of Hans von Bülow

Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141, by Antonín Dvořák (published as No. 2) was first performed in London on April 22, 1885 shortly after the piece was completed on March 17, 1885.

Composition history

Dvořák’s work on the symphony began on December 13, 1884. Dvořák heard and admired Brahms‘s new 3rd Symphony, and this prompted him to think of writing of a new symphony himself. So it was fortuitous that in that same year the Philharmonic Society of London invited him to write a new symphony and elected him as an honorary member. A month later, after his daily walk to the railway station in Prague, he said “the first subject of my new symphony flashed in to my mind on the arrival of the festive train bringing our countrymen from Pest”. The Czechs were in fact coming to the National Theatre in Prague, where there was to be a musical evening to support the political struggles of the Czech nation. He resolved that his new symphony would reflect this struggle. In doing so the symphony would also reveal something of his personal struggle in reconciling his simple and peaceful countryman’s feelings with his intense patriotism and his wish to see the Czech nation flourish.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550 Karl Bohm Wiener Philarmoniker



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550Karl Bhom conducts Wiener Philarmoniker:

 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Molto allegro 0:40
Andante 9:42
Menuetto, allegretto 17:25
Finale, allegro assai 22:05

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.[1]

 

 

 

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic



Great presentation of the Great Wiener Philharmoniker conducted by Herbert von Karajan, playing the 9th Symphony of Antonin Dvorak “From the new world”. 

Gran presentación de la Filarmónica de Viena conducida por Herbert von Karajan, interpretando la novena sinfonía de Antonin Dvorak “Sinfonía del Nuevo Mundo”.

(C) Telemonde 1992, UMG and all their respective owners. No commercial use of this material.

(0:37) 1st mvt (Adagio, Allegro Molto)
(10:42) 2nd mvt (Largo)
(23:30) 3rd mvt (Scherzo, Molto Vivace)
(32:07) 4rth mvt (Allegro con fuoco)

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Bedrich Smetana: Louisa’s Polka



Bedřich Smetana (March 2, 1824 — May 12, 1884) was a Czech composer who pioneered the development of a musical style which became closely identified with his country’s aspirations to independent statehood. He is thus widely regarded in his homeland as the father of Czech music.

When he was young, his father sent him to Prague to study in the autumn of 1839. After his father discovered that the young son was not paying much attention to his school, the father placed him temporarily with his uncle in Nové Město, where he enjoyed a brief romance with his cousin Louisa. He commemorated their passion in Louisa’s Polka, Smetana’s earliest complete composition that has survived.

This is my way to commemorate Smetana’s birthday (March 2, 1824) by combining his melodious dance music with some of the great dance clips from Hollywood films.

Music: Louisa’s Polka — Bedrich Smetana
Performed by Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Frantisek Jilek

Visual excerpts taken from these videos:
Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell: “Jukebox Dance” — Film: Broadway Melody (1940)
Fred Astaire, Leslie Caron: “Sluefoot” — Daddy Long Legs (1955)
Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell: “Begin the Beguine” — Film: Broadway Melody (1940)
Fred Astaire and Marjorie Reynolds : “Be Careful, It’s My Heart”– Holiday Inn (1942)
Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers: “Too Hot to Handle” — Roberta (1935).
Lisa Miles and Tim Balfour – A Variation on Fred and Ginger for the third act of Opera Australia’s production of Die Fledermaus at the Sydney Opera House.
Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines — Film: White Nights (1985)
Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth: “So Near and Yet So Far” — Film: You Will Never Get Rich (1941)

 

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FABULOUS COMPOSITIONS/COMPOSERS: SMETANA MA VLAST – MOLDAU


 

Statue of Bedřich Smetana by the Vltava river

Statue of Bedřich Smetana by the Vltava river (Photo credit: Jorge Lascar)

Má vlast (Czech pronunciation: [maː vlast], meaning”Mycountry/homeland”) is a set of six symphonic poems composed between 1874 and 1879 by the Czech composer Bedřich Smetana. While it is often presented as a single work in six movements and – with the exception of Vltava – is almost always recorded that way, the six pieces were conceived as individual works. They had their own separate premieres between 1875 and 1880; the premiere of the complete set took place on 5 November 1882 in Prague, under Adolf Čech, who had also conducted two of the individual premieres.

 

In these works Smetana combined the symphonic poem form pioneered by Franz Liszt with the ideals of nationalistic music which were current in the late nineteenth century. Each poem depicts some aspect of the countryside, history, or legends of Bohemia.

 

Vltava [DIE MOLDAU]

 

The Vltava in Prague

 

Vltava, also known by its German name Die Moldau (or The Moldau), was composed between 20 November and 8 December 1874 and was premiered on 4 April 1875 under Adolf Čech. It is about 12 minutes long, and is in the key of E minor.

 

In this piece, Smetana uses tone painting to evoke the sounds of one of Bohemia’s great rivers.[2] In his own words:

 

The composition describes the course of the Vltava, starting from the two small springs, the Cold and Warm Vltava, to the unification of both streams into a single current, the course of the Vltava through woods and meadows, through landscapes where a farmer’s wedding is celebrated, the round dance of the mermaids in the night’s moonshine: on the nearby rocks loom proud castles, palaces and ruins aloft. The Vltava swirls into the St John’s Rapids; then it widens and flows toward Prague, past the Vyšehrad, and then majestically vanishes into the distance, ending at the Labe (orElbe, in German).

 

Motif of Vltava

 

The piece contains Smetana’s most famous tune. It is an adaptation of the melody La Mantovana, attributed to the Italian renaissance tenor Giuseppe Cenci (also known as Giuseppino),[3] which, in a borrowedMoldovan form, was also the basis for the Israeli national anthemHatikvah. The tune also appears in major in an old folk Czech song Kočka leze dírou (“The Cat Crawls Through the Hole”), and Hanns Eislerused it for his “Song of the Moldau”.
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Antonin Dvorak – Slavonic Dance No. 10 in E minor, Op. 72, No. 2


 

Claude Debussy Printemps, symphonic suite, conductor Francesco Mander



Francesco Mander conducts the symphonic suitePrintemps” by Claude Debussy. There are two movements: Très modéré – Modéré. This is a very early work by the composer. The orchestra is the National Symphony Orchestra

 

B. Smetana: Prodaná nevěsta (předehra) / The Bartered Bride (Overture)



Záznam z Novoročního koncertu České filharmonie 1. 1. 2013 v pražském Rudolfinu. / Czech Philharmonic performing at the 2013 New Year Eve’s concert in Rudolfinum, Prague.

Česká filharmonie
Jiří Bělohlávek — dirigent / conductor

Zvuk: Český rozhlas / Audio: Czech Radio

 

FABULOUS PERFORMANCES: A. Dvorak – Slavonic dance No. 2 in E minor op. 72



A. Dvorak – Slavonic dance No. 2 in E minor op. 72

Violin: Itzhak Perlman
Cello: Yo-Yo Ma
Conductor: Seiji Ozawa

 

Robert Schumann: Concertpiece for 4 Horns in F Op 86



R.Schumann Concert Piece for 4 French Horns and Orchestra Op.86

1. Lebhaft
2. Romanze. Ziemlicj langsam, doch nicht schleppend (att.)
3. Sehr lebhaft

Zdenek Tylsar French Horn
Bedrich Tylsar French Horn
Stanislav Suchanek French Horn
Emanuel Hrdina French Horn

Dvořák Chamber Orchestra
František Vajnar Conductor

Rec.: 1976 in Prague

 

BEDŘICH SMETANA – VLTAVA


Bedřich Smetana


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  
“Smetana” redirects here. For other uses, see Smetana (disambiguation).
Portrait of balding, bearded, bespectacled middle-aged man with solemn expression, wearing a bow tie and high-buttoned jacket

Portrait of Bedřich Smetana

Smetana signature.jpg

Bedřich Smetana (Czech pronunciation: [ˈbɛdr̝ɪx ˈsmɛtana] ( listen); 2 March 1824 – 12 May 1884) was a Czech composer who pioneered the development of a musical style which became closely identified with his country’s aspirations to independent statehood. He is thus widely regarded in his homeland as the father of Czech music. Internationally he is best known for his opera The Bartered Bride, for the symphonic cycle Má vlast (“My Fatherland”), which portrays the history, legends and landscape of the composer’s native land, and for his First String Quartet From My Life. Continue reading

ANTONIN DVORÁK – SINFONIE NO. 8 IN G-DUR OP. 88 – WIENER PHILHARMONIKER – HERBERT VON KARAJAN



I. Allegro con brio[0:06]
II. Adagio – [9:57]
III. Allegretto grazioso, molto vivace – [21:28]
IV. Allegro ma non troppo – [27:05]
Wiener Philharmoniker – 
Herbert von Karajan, Leitung –
Großer Musikvereinssaal Wien
Januar/Februar 1985

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Symphony No. 8
by Antonín Dvořák
Dvořák 8058.jpg

Title page of the autograph score
Key G major
Catalogue
  • Op. 88
  • B. 163
Style Romantic
Composed 26 August 1889 – 8 November 1889 –Vysoká u Příbramě
Dedication Bohemian Academy of Science, Literature and Arts
Published 1890
Movements 4
Premiere
Date 2 February 1890
Location Prague
Conductor Antonín Dvořák
Performers Orchestra of the National Theatre

The Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88, B. 163, is a symphony by Antonín Dvořák, composed in 1889 at Vysoká u PříbraměBohemia, on the occasion of his election to the Bohemian Academy of Science, Literature and Arts. Continue reading

Dvořák – Czech Suite, Op. 39


Composer: Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904)
Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

Adolf Čech conducted the first performance in Prague on May 16, 1879

I. Preludium (Pastorale)Allegro moderato
II. Polka – Allegretto grazioso
III. Sousedská (Minuetto) – Allegro giusto
IV. Romance (Romanza) – Andante con moto
V. Finale (Furiant) – Presto

 

Dvorak – Piano Quintet No.2 in A, Op.81



[Verbier 2013]
Yuri Bashmet
Vilde Frang
Daniil Trifonov
Renaud Capuçon
Gautier Capuçon

 
 Antonín Dvořák‘s Piano Quintet No. 2 in A major, Op. 81, B. 155, is a quintet for piano, 2 violinsviola, and cello. It was composed between August 18 and October 8 of 1887, and was premiered in Prague on January 6, 1888. The quintet is acknowledged as one of the masterpieces in the form, along with those of Schubert,SchumannBrahms and Shostakovich.[1]

The music has four movements:

  1. Allegro, ma non tanto
  2. DumkaAndante con moto
  3. Scherzo (Furiant): molto vivace
  4. Finale: Allegro.

 

 

Violin Concerto in A minor Opus 53 (III Giocoso Ma Non Troppo) by Antonin Dvorak- David Oistrach


Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 (B.108) is a concerto for violin and orchestra composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1879. The concerto was premiered in 1883 by František Ondříček in Prague. He also gave the premieres in Vienna and London. Today it remains an important work in the violin repertoire.

The concerto’s structure is the classical three movements of fast-slow-fast.

  1. Allegro ma non troppo
  2. Adagio ma non troppo
  3. Finale: Allegro giocoso ma non troppo

Antonín Dvořák was inspired to write his concerto after having met Joseph Joachim in 1878 and composed the work with the intention of dedicating it him. However, when he finished the concerto in 1879, Joachim became skeptical about it. Joachim was a strict classicist and objected to Dvořák’s inter alia, or his abrupt truncation of the first movement’s orchestral tutti. Joachim also didn’t like the fact that the recapitulation was cut short and that it led directly to the slow second movement. It is also assumed that he was upset with the persistent repetition found in the third movement. However, Joachim never said anything outright and instead claimed to be editing the solo part. He never actually performed the piece.

(Sourse: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_Concerto_(Dvo%C5%99%C3%A1k)

Antonín Dvořák – Serenade for Strings in E major, op.22 (Highlights)



Composition and premiere

1875 was a fruitful year for Dvořák‘s composing. This was the same year that he wrote his Symphony No. 5, String Quintet No. 2, Piano Trio No. 1, the opera Vanda, and the Moravian Duets. These were happy times in his life. His marriage was young, and his first son had been born. For the first time in his life, he was starting to be recognized as a composer, and was able to live stably without fear of poverty. He received a generous stipend from a commission in Vienna, which allowed him to compose his Fifth Symphony and several chamber works as well as the Serenade.

Allegedly, Dvořák wrote the Serenade in just 12 days, from 3–14 May. The piece was premiered in Prague on 10 December 1876 by Adolf Čech and the combined orchestras of the Czech and German theatres. It was published in 1877 in the composer’s piano duet arrangement by Emanuel Starý in Prague. The score was printed two years later by Bote and Bock, Berlin.
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serenade_for_Strings_(Dvo%C5%99%C3%A1k)