Tag Archives: brahms

great compositions/performances: Anne-Sophie Mutter – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100


Anne-Sophie Mutter – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100

Advertisements

Brahms – Violin Sonata No 1 in G Mag op. 78


Brahms – Violin Sonata No 1 in G Mag op. 78

historic musical bits: David Oistrakh – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100


David Oistrakh – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

Best classical music, Leonard Bernstein, Brahms Tragic Overture Op.81, great compositions/performances


 

Leonard Bernstein, Brahms Tragic Overture Op.81

 

“Gaudeamus” , Best Classical Music, Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms), great compositions/performances


Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)

Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace , great compositions/performances


Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace

Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77


Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77

Historic musical Bits: Brahms / Herbert von Karajan, 1957: Variations On A Theme By Haydn, Op. 56a , great compositions/performances


Brahms / Herbert von Karajan, 1957: Variations On A Theme By Haydn, Op. 56a – Complete

Gotta listen! Chopin Valse Op 64. No 2. Waltz in c sharp minor #7 Valentina Lisitsa, WOW!


Chopin Valse Op 64. No 2. Waltz in c sharp minor #7 Valentina Lisitsa

BRAHMS, Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80, great compositions/performances


BRAHMS, Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker. , great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Published on Aug 9, 2013

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

Brahms – Violin Sonata No 1 in G Mag op. 78 Ashkenazy – Perlman, great compositions/performances


BrahmsViolin Sonata No 1 in G Mag op. 78

Brahms, J. – Tragic Overture, Op. 81 (Tragische Ouvertüre): great compositions/performances


Brahms, J. – Tragic Overture, Op. 81

Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.3 in F, Op.90: great compositions/performances


Johannes BrahmsSymphony No.3 in F, Op.90

Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941: great compositions/performances


Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941

Brahms: Academic Festival Overture (Solti, CSO): great compositions/performances


Brahms: Academic Festival Overture (Solti, CSO)

Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a: great compositions/performances


Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a

FROM:

Maxime Brisole

From Wikipedia

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).

 

Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857): make music part of your life series


Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)

Johannes Brahms

Mov.I: Allegro molto 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo: Allegro non troppo 10:27
Mov.III: Adagio non troppo 17:55
Mov.IV: Menuetto I & II 33:35
Mov.V: Scherzo: Allegro 37:13
Mov.VI: Rondo: Allegro 39:47

Orchestra: Capella Agustina
Conductor: Andreas Spering

great compositions/performances: Radu Lupu plays Brahms’ – Rhapsody in g minor Op. 79 No. 2 (with sheet music)


[youtube.com/watch?v=tp-DeAZmKOA]

Radu Lupu plays Brahms’ – Rhapsody in g minor Op. 79 No. 2 (with sheet music)

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Johannes Brahms – Intermezzo Op. 117 No. 1 in E flat major


[youtube.com/watch?v=DjZy4bymvvk]

The 3 Intermezzi Op. 117 were composed in 1892 and are among the best-loved and most popular of Brahms‘ autumnal late piano output. On a smaller and more intimate scale than the surrounding sets of Op. 116, Op. 118 and Op. 119, the composer described these pieces as “lullabies to my sorrows”. Here we find Brahms at his most tender and introspective, with only one outburst (in the third Intermezzo) of the characteristic Brahmsian fieryness. The Intermezzi were inspired by a Scottish poem from Herder’s Volkslieder, and bear this inscription:

Schlaf sanft mein Kind, schlaf sanft und Schön!
Mich dauert’s sehr, dich weinen sehn.

Sleep softly my child, sleep softly and well!
It hurts my heart to see you weeping. 

Piano: Idil Biret

Picture: Winter, Close of Day by George Innes

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)



Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


From Wikipedia:

The Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, is a symphony by Johannes Brahms. The work was written in the summer of 1883 at Wiesbaden, nearly six years after he completed his Second Symphony. In the interim Brahms had written some of his greatest works, including the Violin Concerto, two overtures (Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture), and the Second Piano Concerto.

The premiere performance was given on 2 December 1883 by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Hans Richter. The shortest of Brahms’ four symphonies, a typical performance lasts between 30 and 40 minutes.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, a contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombonestimpani, and strings.

Form

The symphony consists of four movements, marked as follows:

  1. Allegro con brio (F major), in sonata form.
  2. Andante (C major), in a modified sonata form.
  3. Poco allegretto (C minor), in ternary form (A B A’).
  4. Allegro (F minor/F major), in a modified sonata form.

History

Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere of the symphony, proclaimed it to be Brahms’ Eroica. The symphony was well received, more so than his Second Symphony. Although Richard Wagner had died earlier that year, the public feud between Brahms and Wagner had not yet subsided. Wagner enthusiasts tried to interfere with the symphony’s premiere, and the conflict between the two factions nearly brought about a duel.[1]

After each performance, Brahms polished his score further, until it was published in May 1884. His friend and influential music critic Eduard Hanslick said, “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect.”[1]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life: Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)



Johannes Brahms

Work: Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857) for orchestra

Mov.I: Allegro molto 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo: Allegro non troppo 10:27
Mov.III: Adagio non troppo 17:55
Mov.IV: Menuetto I & II 33:35
Mov.V: Scherzo: Allegro 37:13
Mov.VI: Rondo: Allegro 39:47

Orchestra: Capella Agustina

Conductor: Andreas Spering

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, is a symphony by Johannes Brahms. The work was written in the summer of 1883 at Wiesbaden, nearly six years after he completed his Second Symphony. In the interim Brahms had written some of his greatest works, including the Violin Concerto, two overtures (Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture), and the Second Piano Concerto.

The premiere performance was given on 2 December 1883 by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Hans Richter. The shortest of Brahms’ four symphonies, a typical performance lasts between 30 and 40 minutes.

Form

The symphony consists of four movements, marked as follows:

  1. Allegro con brio (F major), in sonata form.
  2. Andante (C major), in a modified sonata form.
  3. Poco allegretto (C minor), in ternary form (A B A’).
  4. Allegro (F minor/F major), in a modified sonata form.

History

Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere of the symphony, proclaimed it to be Brahms’ Eroica. The symphony was well received, more so than his Second Symphony. Although Richard Wagner had died earlier that year, the public feud between Brahms and Wagner had not yet subsided. Wagner enthusiasts tried to interfere with the symphony’s premiere, and the conflict between the two factions nearly brought about a duel.[1]

After each performance, Brahms polished his score further, until it was published in May 1884. His friend and influential music critic Eduard Hanslick said, “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect.”[1]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Johannes Brahms – Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 83



Claudio Arrau, piano.

Concertgebouw-Orchester, Amsterdam.

Recorded: Concertgebrouw, Amsterdam, October 1969. 

Bernard Haitink, conductor.

1. Allegro Non Troppo 
2. Allegro Appassionato 
3. Andante – Più Adagio 
4. Allegretto Grazioso – Un Poco Più Presto

The Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 83 by Johannes Brahms is a composition for solo piano with orchestral accompaniment. It is separated by a gap of 22 years from the composer’s first piano concerto. Brahms began work on the piece in 1878 and completed it in 1881 while in Pressbaum near Vienna. It is dedicated to his teacher, Eduard Marxsen. The premiere of the concerto was given in Budapest on November 9, 1881, with Brahms as soloist, and was an immediate success. He proceeded to perform the piece in many cities across Europe.

Allegro non troppo
The first movement is in the concerto variant of sonata form. The main theme is introduced with a horn solo, with the piano interceding. The woodwind instruments proceed to introduce a small motif before an unusually placed cadenza appears. The full orchestra repeats the theme and introduces more motifs in the orchestral exposition. The piano and orchestra work together to develop these themes in the piano exposition before the key changes to F minor (from F major, the dominant) and the piano plays a powerful and difficult section before the next orchestral tutti appears. The development, like many such sections in the Classical period, works its way from the dominant key back to the tonic while heavily developing themes. At the beginning of the recapitulation, the theme is replayed before a differing transition is heard, returning to the music heard in the piano exposition (this time in B-flat major / B-flat minor). A coda appears after the minor key section, finishing off this movement.

Allegro appassionato
This scherzo is in the key of D minor and is in ternary form. Contrary to Brahms’s “tiny wisp of a scherzo” remark, it is a tumultuous movement. The piano and orchestra introduce the theme and develop it before a quiet section intervenes. Soon afterwards the piano and orchestra launch into a stormy development of the theme before coming to the central episode (in D major). The central episode is brisk and begins with the full orchestra before yet another quiet section intervenes; then the piano is integrated into the orchestral effect to repeat the theme of the central episode. The beginning section returns but is highly varied.

Andante
The slow movement is in the tonic key of B-flat major and is unusual in utilizing an extensive cello solo within a piano concerto. Brahms subsequently rewrote the cello’s theme and changed it into a song, Immer leiser wird mein Schlummer (“My Slumber grows ever more Peaceful”) with lyrics by Hermann Van Lingg. (Op. 105, No. 2). Within the concerto, the cello plays the theme for the first three minutes, before the piano comes in. However, the gentler melodic piece that the piano plays soon gives way to a stormy theme in B-flat minor. When the storm subsides, still in the minor key, the piano plays a transitional motif that leads to the key of G-Flat major, before the Cello comes in to reprise, in the wrong key, and knowing that it has to get back to B-flat major, the piano and the orchestra make a transition to finish off the theme in its original home key of B-flat major. After the piano plays the transitional motifs, the piano quickly reprises the middle section in a major key, before playing the final chords to end this beautiful movement.

Allegretto grazioso
The last movement consists of five clearly distinguishable sections, of which the last is a ‘stretto’ (faster) coda. The first section (bars 1 to 64) is built on two themes: the first and main theme of classical structure (1-8) is first played by the piano and then repeated by the orchestra. The second theme (16-20) is likewise presented by the piano and repeated – and expanded – by the orchestra. A kind of development of the first theme leads to the next section. The second section (65-164) is built on three themes. Number three (65-73, a minor) is very different from the previous ones: by its minor key and its rhythm, which is Hungarian, in Number four (81-88) is still in a minor and number five (97-104) in F major. These three themes are repeated several times, which gives the section the character of a development. The third section (165-308) can be seen as a reprise of the first; it is built on the first two themes, but a striking new element is given in 201-205 and repeated in 238-241. The fourth section (309-376) gives the themes 3, 5 and 4, in that order. The coda is built on the main theme, but even here (398) Brahms presents a new element, being in a form of a little march, first played by the piano, and then, the orchestra comes in, and trades themes in the march before the final chords.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Fabulous Performances: Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)



Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)

 

Franco GULLI @ SCHUMANN-BRAHMS-DIETRICH Sonata FAE (complete) E.Cavallo,1990



F.A.E. – Violin Sonata (1853) – “In Erwartung der Ankfunt des verehrten und geliebten Freundes JOSEPH JOACHIM, schrieben diese Sonate – Robert SCHUMANN, Johannes BRAHMS, Albert DIETRICH”
0:10 / DIETRICH (1829-1908) – I. Allegro, in A minor [13’40”]
13:37 / SCHUMANN (1810-1856) – II. Intermezzo (Bewegt, doch nicht zu Schnell) WoO 22 [2’26”]
16:16 / BRAHMS (1833-1897) – III. Scherzo (Allegro) in C minor WoO 2 [5’36”]
21:53 / SCHUMANN (1810-1856) – IV. Finale (Markirtes, ziemlich lebhaftes tempo) WoO 22 [6’58”]
Franco GULLI, violin – Enrica Cavallo, piano 
(rec: June 1990, Dynamic Studio, Genova)
________________________________________­__________
Duo Gulli-Cavallo – STRAUSS: http://youtu.be/l8H081NCP7c

 

Dvorak – Piano Quintet No.2 in A, Op.81



[Verbier 2013]
Yuri Bashmet
Vilde Frang
Daniil Trifonov
Renaud Capuçon
Gautier Capuçon

 
 Antonín Dvořák‘s Piano Quintet No. 2 in A major, Op. 81, B. 155, is a quintet for piano, 2 violinsviola, and cello. It was composed between August 18 and October 8 of 1887, and was premiered in Prague on January 6, 1888. The quintet is acknowledged as one of the masterpieces in the form, along with those of Schubert,SchumannBrahms and Shostakovich.[1]

The music has four movements:

  1. Allegro, ma non tanto
  2. DumkaAndante con moto
  3. Scherzo (Furiant): molto vivace
  4. Finale: Allegro.

 

 

Brahms Symphony No. 3 in F Major Op. 90



Brahms’ third symphony, played by the legendary Vienna Philharmonic, conducted by Istvan Kertesz.

First movement: Beginning
Second movement: 13:29
Third movement: 22:12
Fourth movement: 28:16