Category Archives: running

Bisti Badlands Colorado


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Hoodoos on the western edge of the Bisti Badlands under a stormy sky that dropped a foot of snow on Colorado the next day (two weeks ago).  Thanks American Southwest for being such a great source of information.  You are my go-to-resource when planning my hiking/photography trips.

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this pressed: Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse…with Diabetes|via Lilly


Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse…with Diabetes by Amy O’Connor 11/17/15 1 Comment Facebook Twitter Google+ Email Spoiler Alert: This post contains details about last weekend’s episode of The Walking Dead. But, don’t worry, I don’t tell you what happens to Glenn because we still don’t know! On this week’s The Walking Dead, viewers faced a previously unexplored danger in the post-Apocalyptic world—managing diabetes. AMC’s Sunday night favorite introduced Tina, a young woman with more than just hordes of the undead on her mind as she wandered the roads near Alexandria; she also had diabetes. Let’s be honest, managing your diabetes can be tricky. Many viewers on Twitter and Reddit had a hard time fathoming how exactly one survives months or even years into a zombie apocalypse. One thing’s clear to me: Tina had an emergency plan for her diabetes. Life is full of unexpected events, disasters and tragedies, both natural and man-made. For diabetics, these situations become even more challenging. That’s where your emergency plan comes in to play. Check out this handy graphic from our partnership with the American College of Endocrinology for tips on how to make sure you’re prepared for any emergency, zombie or otherwise. Tina may not have survived long in The Walking Dead universe, but, ultimately, it was the bites of two zombies that brought her to her end – not her diabetes. As the episode came to an end, I couldn’t help but feel disappointed that we couldn’t have had a few more weeks to understand just how Tina had made it this far. It seems I wasn’t the only one. Here are a few of my favorite tweets sent during last night’s episode:

Source: Surviving the Zombie Apocalypse…with Diabetes | via Lilly

this day in the yesteryear: Johnny Campbell Becomes World’s First Cheerleader (1898)


Johnny Campbell Becomes World’s First Cheerleader (1898)

Cheerleading first appeared in the US in the late 1880s with crowds chanting to encourage school spirit. The first recorded instance of organized cheering took place at Princeton University in 1884. Later, a Princeton graduate introduced the idea at University of Minnesota football games. In 1898, Minnesota student Johnny Campbell directed a crowd in a cheer—marking the official birth of organized cheerleading. The first cheer squads were all male. When did women enter the world of cheerleading? More… Discuss

this pressed: HEALTH – DIABETES: Pictures of Famous People With Diabetes|via WebMD


tom hanks

The Oscar-winning actor announced he has type 2 diabetes when late-night host David Letterman commented on his newly slim figure in October 2013. “I went to the doctor and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated. You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man.'” Hanks added that the condition is controllable, but he joked that he couldn’t get back down to his high-school weight of 96 pounds. “I was a very skinny boy!

This WebMD slideshow presents pictures of celebrities with type 1 or type 2 diabetes including Halle Berry, Larry King, and Nick Jonas from The Jonas Brothers.

Source: Pictures of Famous People With Diabetes

Sodium Correction Practice and Clinical Outcomes in Profound Hyponatremia


Article Outline Patients and Methods Study Design and Setting Study Participants and Data Collection Statistical Analyses Results Discussion Conclusion Supplemental Online Material References Abstract Objectives To assess the epidemiology of nonoptimal hyponatremia correction and to identify associated morbidity and in-hospital mortality. Patients and Methods An electronic medical record search identified all patients admitted with profound hyponatremia (sodium <120 mmol/L) from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2012. Patients were classified as having optimally or nonoptimally corrected hyponatremia at 24 hours after admission. Optimal correction was defined as sodium correction in 24 hours of 6 through 10 mmol/L. We investigated the association between sodium correction and demographic and outcome variables, including occurrence of osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS). Baseline characteristics by correction outcome categories were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test for continuous variables and the χ2 test for categorical variables. Odds ratios for in-hospital mortality between groups were assessed using logistic regression. Adjusted differences in hospital length of stay (LOS) and intensive care unit (ICU) LOS were assessed using the Dunnett 2-tailed t test. Results A total of 412 patients satisfied inclusion criteria of whom 174 (42.2%) were admitted to the ICU. A total of 211 (51.2%) had optimal correction of their hyponatremia at 24 hours, 87 (21.1%) had undercorrected hyponatremia, and 114 (27.9%) had overcorrected hyponatremia. Both patient factors and treatment factors were associated with nonoptimal correction. There was a single case of ODS. Overcorrection was not associated with in-hospital mortality or ICU LOS. When adjusted for patient factors, undercorrection of profound hyponatremia was associated with an increase in hospital LOS (9.3 days; 95% CI, 1.9-16.7 days). Conclusion Nonoptimal correction of profound hyponatremia is common. Fortunately, nonoptimal correction is associated with serious morbidity only infrequently.

Source: Sodium Correction Practice and Clinical Outcomes in Profound Hyponatremia – Mayo Clinic Proceedings

Heart of L.A. is today! Join in on the fun:


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Franz Benda – Violin Concerto in D major


Franz Benda – Violin Concerto in D major

From the Hill : ON SUMAC TRAIL


From the Hill : ON SUMAC TRAIL

San Gabriel River Bikeway River End Cafe to Liberty Park (Speedified X6)


San Gabriel River Bikeway River End Cafe to Liberty Park (Speedified X6)

On Peppergrass Trail Heading Southwest


On Peppergrass Trail Heading Southwest

New at EUZICASA: Watch “On Mariposa: Nature Sounds”



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Cabbage leaf mustard – Recipes Wiki


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Mustard greens

Wikipedia Article About Mustard greens on Wikipedia

The mustards are several plant species in the genus Brassica whose proverbially tiny mustard seeds are used as a spice and, by   grinding and mixing them with water, vinegar or other liquids, are turned into a condiment also known as mustard. The seeds are also pressed to make mustard oil, and the edible leaves can be eaten as mustard greens.

Mild white mustard (Brassica hirta) grows wild in North Africa, the Middle East and Mediterranean Europe and has spread farther by long cultivation; brown or Indian mustard (B. juncea), originally from the foothills of the Himalaya, is grown commercially in the UK, Canada and the US; black mustard (B. nigra) in Argentina, Chile, the US and some European countries. Canada grows 90% of all the mustard seed for the international market.

In addition to the mustards, the genus Brassica also includes cabbages, cauliflower, rapeseed and turnips.

There has been recent research into varieties of mustards that have a high oil content for use in the production of biodiesel, a renewable liquid fuel similar to diesel fuel. The biodiesel made from mustard oil has good cold flow properties and cetane ratings. The leftover meal after pressing out the oil has also been found to be an effective pesticide.

An interesting genetic relationship between many species of mustard have been observed, and is described as the Triangle of U.

via Cabbage leaf mustard – Recipes Wiki.

Brassica juncea
Brassica juncea - Köhler–s Medizinal-Pflanzen-168.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Brassica
Species: B. juncea
Binomial name
Brassica juncea
(L.) Vassiliĭ Matveievitch Czernajew (1796 – 1871)

 

From The Hill: Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!


Peppergrass trail 360 VIEW (Puente Hills (Whittier) Nature Preserve Authority): Let’s Go Hiking!