Watch “Leonard Cohen – 11 – Tonight Will Be Fine (Berlin 1974) [with lyrics]” on YouTube



Sometimes I find I get to thinking of the past.
We swore to each other then that our love would surely last.
You kept right on loving, I went on a fast,
Now I am too thin and your love is too vast.
But I know from your eyes
And I know from your smile
That tonight will be fine,
Will be fine, will be fine, will be fine
For a while.

I choose the rooms that I live in with care,
The windows are small and the walls almost bare,
There’s only one bed and there’s only one prayer;
I listen all night for your step on the stair.
But I know from your eyes
And I know from your smile
That tonight will be fine,
Will be fine, will be fine, will be fine
For a while.
Oh sometimes I see her undressing for me,
She’s the soft naked lady love meant her to be
And she’s moving her body so brave and so free.
If I’ve got to remember that’s a fine memory.
And I know from her eyes
And I know from her smile
That tonight will be fine,
Will be fine, will be fine, will be fine
For a while.
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Leonard Cohen
Tonight Will Be Fine lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Wikipedia: List of The Blacklist characters


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Blacklist_characters?wprov=sfla1

List of The Blacklistcharacters

The Blacklist is an American crime drama television series that premiered on NBC on September 23, 2013. Raymond “Red” Reddington (James Spader), a former government agent turned high-profile criminal, who had eluded capture for decades, voluntarily surrenders to the FBI, offering to cooperate on capturing a list of criminals who are virtually impossible to catch. He insists on working with a rookie profiler by the name of Elizabeth Keen (Megan Boone). The show also stars Diego Klattenhoff, Ryan Eggold and Harry Lennix. The pilot episode was written by Jon Bokenkamp and directed by Joe Carnahan. Executive producers for the series include Bokenkamp, John Eisendrath, and John Davis for Sony Pictures Television, Universal Television, and Davis Entertainment. In February 2015, The Blacklist was renewed for a third season,[1] with Hisham Tawfiq promoted to main cast.[2]

Cast overview

Actor Character Position Seasons
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
James Spader Raymond “Red” Reddington Confidential informant, FBI Main
Megan Boone Elizabeth “Liz” Keen/Masha Rostova Special Agent, FBI
Special consultant, FBI
Main
Diego Klattenhoff Donald Ressler Special agent, FBI
Director of the Counterterrorism Division, FBI
Main
Ryan Eggold Tom Keen/Jacob Phelps/Christopher Hargrave Covert operative Main
Parminder Nagra Meera Malik Field agent, CIA Main
Harry Lennix Harold Cooper Director of the Counterterrorism Division, FBI Main
Amir Arison Aram Mojtabai Computer specialist, FBI Recurring Main
Mozhan Marnò Samar Navabi Agent, Former Mossad agent Main
Hisham Tawfiq Dembe Zuma Reddington’s bodyguard Recurring Main

Main characters featured in The Blacklis

Raymond Reddington/Ilya Koslov

Raymond Reddington is portrayed by James Spader, since 2013

Portrayed by James Spader

Raymond “Red” Reddington is a former government agent, presumed to be a member of the United States Navy, and number 4 on the FBI’s Most Wanted List.[3] A U.S. Naval Academygraduate, he once worked in US counterintelligence and was being groomed for Admiral when something happened on his way home for the Christmas holidays. It is later revealed that Reddington was accused of committing treason by leaking information to the Soviet Union which led to the death of several American naval officers. Nicknamed “the concierge of crime”, Reddington is known for brokering deals between criminals. He willingly surrenders to the FBI and provides information on a roster of criminals that he refers to as The Blacklist: dangerous criminals who are so careful to avoid leaving any traces behind that the FBI has not even detected their existence. His ethics are somewhat murky, and he espouses the use of some crimes (such as extortion, counterfeiting, torture, and murder) in the service of “the greater good”. He uses his arrangement with the FBI to pursue his own secret agenda; it was revealed that he needed their help to find Berlin, a mysterious nemesis who had been attacking his organization.

He has an unexplained interest in Elizabeth Keen and knows personal secrets about her that she has never made public. He will stop at nothing to protect her and even went as far as to block her memories of the fire she was trapped in. But she finally regains them and learns that when her father attacked her mother, she killed him while still a child. Red explains that he never wanted Liz to end up like him and was trying to prevent that. He had a romantic affair with Liz’s mother, Katarina Rostova, and it is implied several times that he may be Liz’s biological father. No proof of this is ever shown, and Red himself initially denies it when directly confronted by Liz, although he does claim that he knew her father well. Red is confirmed as Liz’s father in “Dr. Adrian Shaw: Conclusion”, and in “Mr. Kaplan: Conclusion”, he finally acknowledges this to Liz after she presents him with a DNA test confirming his paternity. In “Monarch Douglas Bank”, it was revealed that Red used to be married to Naomi Hyland and has a daughter named Jennifer. In “Dr. Linus Creel”, when he confronted Naomi about her, he discovers that Jennifer left her after her marriage to Frank and hasn’t tried to make contact since then.

After the death of Alan Fitch, Reddington comes into conflict with the Director, the new head of the Cabal. The Director did not believe that Reddington had the Fulcrum, a blackmail file which Reddington had used as leverage to force a stalemate with the Cabal, and wanted to end the détente and kill Reddington. In response, Reddington urgently began seeking the Fulcrum, and managed to collect various items needed to decrypt it. Finally, after he confessed to Liz that he had initially hired Tom Keen to enter her life and watch over her, she gave him the Fulcrum, after which he was shot by the Director’s agents. However, he survived. He continued to throw obstacles into Liz’s path as she sought to find out more about her mother. When Liz was framed by the Cabal for the assassination of Senator Hawkins, Reddington countered by gathering 11 of the world’s top investigative journalists and giving them the information contained in the Fulcrum. He later helped Liz go on the run after she assassinated Attorney GeneralTom Connolly, a member of the Cabal.

Accompanied by Liz, Reddington goes on the run to gather various resources needed for his plan to bring down the Director and exonerate Liz. He eventually succeeds in forcing the Cabal to abandon the Director, and then kills him. However, Red is unable to clear Liz completely of the killing of Tom Connolly and she only returns to the taskforce as an asset like Red himself. He meets with Laurel Hitchin, who suggests he weakened the Cabal so that they would invite him to join it.

After watching Liz die in his arms Dembe convinces Red to leave the van containing her body and Ressler places his FBI windbreaker around Red’s shoulders and leads him over to the car with Dembe. As Ressler lets go of Red’s arm and Red goes to get into the car he collapses and Dembe catches him saying: “I got you.” And preceding to help Red into the car. After being told to stay away from Agnes by Tom in “Cape May”, Red goes on a self-imposed exile to get away from everything and find better means to cope with Liz’s death. He rescues a woman who attempted suicide one time and takes her back to the abandoned hotel. Only when a man talks to Red at the beach, that he realized the woman he rescued was a ghost and it was she who tells him that he did save her, through channeling his grief in losing Liz. In “The Artax Network”, Red finally visits Dom, the father of Katarina, and while he still blames him for what he done, Dom reluctantly allows Red to stay. When Aram tracks him down to try and convince Red to help them again, he refuses to leave and sends Aram on his way. Dom later convinces Red to leave and honor his word to the FBI, saying that Red’s got good people who count on him. As a token of gratitude, Red fixes a C♯ key on Dom’s piano and leaves. Red later visits Aram and tells him they have work to do.

In “Dr. Adrian Shaw: Conclusion”, while Red is being held captive and threatened by Alexander Kirk, Red admits that he is in fact Elizabeth Keen’s father. As Kirk goes to kill him, Red whispers something to Kirk that changes his mind and the two men disappear by the time the FBI arrive. Red later tells Liz that Kirk is “gone” but doesn’t elaborate further and doesn’t tell her that he’s her father.

In “Lipet’s Seafood Company” Red is berated by Cooper for letting Alexander Kirk go, but Red tells him that Kirk is gone and won’t be coming back and moves on. Red works to meet with the President-Elect to whose campaign he contributed in exchange for his help with the Alexander Kirk situation and is eventually able to secure a Presidential pardon for Liz killing Tom Connolly. As a result, Liz is able to be reinstated as an FBI agent.

In “The Apothecary”, Red is poisoned and needs the FBI to find Asa Hightower, the man who poisoned him. When confronting Marvin Gerard for not being at the dinner, he learns that Dembe has left him.

In “Dembe Zuma” Red finds out that Dembe left his side in order to find the traitor in his syndicate. Aram helps him out by procuring one name, Kathryn Nemec, whom Red recognizes as Mr. Kaplan. When confronting the man who housed her and shot Dembe, Red and Baz discovered he wired a bomb and escaped as he died in his house.

In “Requiem”, Kaplan calls Red and he confronts her for hiding Liz from him. She tells him she needed to do what she should’ve done years ago in keeping Liz away from him and mentions that she has just begun her revenge. When Red tries to claim that she helped build his syndicate tight, Kaplan reminds him that she is the one who knows where the bodies of the people he had killed are buried and that she hid them from the FBI over the years, including that of Diane Fowler. This makes Red worried when Kaplan reveals that they can be used to not only attack his syndicate, but also destroy him from within.

In “Mr. Kaplan”, many of Red’s associates have broken rank and joined Kaplan in her plans for revenge. He also learns that Julian Gale, a rogue FBI agent, is working with her in order to procure the immunity deal between Red and the FBI. Red tries to appeal to Kaplan to end the war, but she refused, telling him that Liz needs to know the truth.

In “Mr. Kaplan, Conclusion”, Red takes Ressler to Hitchin’s cleaner, Henry Prescott, to help him find a barrel marked back two years ago. When they open it, Red tells Ressler that he had just found Reven Wright. With the evidence, he and Ressler appeal to Hitchin for help. When she tried to refuse, Red tells her that unless she wants to be held accountable for both the Task Force’s downfall and the murder of Wright, she better uphold her end of the bargain and end the indictment on the Task Force. Red tries to appeal to Kaplan again at the bridge, promising he won’t shoot her. He is shocked when she decided to jump to her own death. Later on, Red is confronted by Liz who tells him that she now knows he’s her father. At Tansi Farms, Red and Dembe discover the suitcase buried there is gone and that they must get it back before Liz discovers the truth about how her mother, Katarina Rostova, died.

In “Ian Garvey: Conclusion”, despite taking Garvey hostage and en route to collecting the skeletal remains of Katarina, Ian rams his sedan into another car, leaving Red and Dembe there as he escapes. Red later confronts Garvey after learning that the latter now knows that Liz is his daughter. Only then, Jennifer confronts Red for what he’s done and the fact that Ian saved her and Naomi’s life from their disappointment when they learned of his criminal career. Red then recognizes her from all the years. Despite Garvey shooting first, Red fires back and shoots him.

Continue reading

Watch “Gordon Lightfoot – Sundown (Lyrics)” on YouTube



I can see her lyin’ back in her satin dress
In a room where ya do what ya don’t confess
Sundown you better take care
If I find you beenn creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown ya better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs

She’s been lookin’ like a queen in a sailor’s dream
And she don’t always say what she really means
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
I can picture every move that a man could make
Getting lost in her lovin’ is your first mistake
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again
I can see her lookin’ fast in her faded jeans
She’s a hard lovin’ woman, got me feelin’ mean
Sometimes I think it’s a shame
When I get feelin’ better when I’m feelin’ no pain
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sundown you better take care
If I find you been creepin’ ’round my back stairs
Sometimes I think it’s a sin
When I feel like I’m winnin’ when I’m losin’ again
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Gordon Lightfoot
Sundown lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc

Watch “Classical Music for Brain Power – Bach” on YouTube


Horoscope♉: 11/16/2019


Horoscope♉:
11/16/2019

Words may hold charged energy, so be careful what you say and how you say it. The mood today requires that people have space to express themselves. Allow them their freedom or you may end up getting wedged into a corner with no escape. It’s like painting a floor. You need to start at the back and work your way toward the door instead of the other way around.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: Surin Elephant Round-Up


Today’s Holiday:
Surin Elephant Round-Up

The Elephant Round-Up is an internationally famous show of 200 or more trained elephants held annually in the provincial capital of Surin, Thailand. A tug-of-war is staged where elephants are pitted against Thai soldiers, and there are also log-pulling contests, a soccer game with two teams of elephants kicking a giant soccer ball, elephant basketball, and other sports. A highlight is the spectacular array of elephants rigged out to reenact a medieval war parade. Besides the elephant demonstrations, there are cultural performances and folk dancing. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus (42 BCE)


Today’s Birthday:
Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus (42 BCE)

Tiberius was the second Roman emperor. The stepson of the first Roman emperor, Augustus, he undertook his first military command at age 22 and earned great acclaim. Forced to give up his beloved wife to marry Augustus’s daughter, he went into a self-imposed exile until he was recalled by Augustus and named his heir. As emperor, he initially ran the state efficiently and instituted reforms, but he became increasingly brutal. Who smothered Tiberius while he was recovering from an illness in 37 CE? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Hoxne Hoard Found in Britain (1992)


This Day in History:
Hoxne Hoard Found in Britain (1992)

In 1992, a tenant farmer in the village of Hoxne, England, lost a hammer and asked a friend for help finding it with a metal detector. While searching the field, the friend discovered silver utensils, gold jewelry, and numerous gold and silver coins. Archaeologists notified of the find excavated the site the next day and found what has become known as the Hoxne Hoard—the largest hoard of late Roman silver and gold discovered in Britain. What objects are among its treasures? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: W. Somerset Maugham


Quote of the Day:
W. Somerset Maugham

Art…is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: The Pan-American Highway


Article of the Day:
The Pan-American Highway

Stretching some 30,000 mi (48,000 km), the Pan-American Highway is a system of roads connecting North and South America. Originally conceived as a single route in 1923, it was financed by the US during the 1940s and 1950s and grew to include a number of designated highways in participating countries, extending from Alaska and Canada to Chile, Argentina, and Brazil. However, the system is far from uniform; some stretches are passable only during the dry season, and there are gaps where? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: from a mile away


Idiom of the Day:
from a mile away

Well or far in advance; exceptionally easily. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: rumpus


Word of the Day:
rumpus

Definition: (noun) A noisy, confused, or disruptive commotion.

Synonyms: ruckus, ruction, commotion, din, tumult

Usage: He left before the rumpus devolved into an all-out brawl and so avoided spending the night in jail with his buddies.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Watch “Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3 – Sir Neville Marriner, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra” on YouTube


Ancient Airs and Dances

Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composerOttorino Respighi, freely transcribed from original pieces for lute. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 1 (1917)Edit

Ancient Airs, Suite No. 1

  1. Balletto, “Il Conte Orlando”
  2. Gagliarda

  3. Villanella

  4. Passo mezzo e mascherada

Problems playing these files? See media help.
Suite No. 1 P 109 was composed in 1917. It was based on Renaissance lute pieces by Simone Molinaro, Vincenzo Galilei (father of Galileo Galilei) and additional anonymous composers.

Balletto: “Il Conte Orlando” (Simone Molinaro, 1599)

Gagliarda (Vincenzo Galilei, 1550s)

Villanella (anonymous, end of 16th century)

Passo mezzo e mascherada (anonymous, end of 16th century)

The orchestration calls for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in F, trumpet in D, harp, harpsichord and strings.

Suite No. 2 (1923)Edit

Suite No. 2, P 138 was composed in 1923. It was based on pieces for lute, archlute, and viol by Fabritio Caroso, Jean-Baptiste Besard, Bernardo Gianoncelli, and an anonymous composer. It also includes an aria attributed to Marin Mersenne.

Laura soave: balletto con gagliarda, saltarello e canario (Fabritio Caroso)

Danza rustica (Jean-Baptiste Besard)

Campanae parisienses (anonymous) & Aria (attributed to Marin Mersenne)

Bergamasca (Bernardo Gianoncelli, 1650)

The orchestration calls for an average-sized orchestra of 3 flutes (3rd doubling piccolo), 2 oboes, English horn, 2 clarinets in A/B♭, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in D (doubling 2 horns in E/F), 2 trumpets in A/D (doubling trumpet in C), 3 trombones, 3 timpani, celesta, harpsichord 4-hands, harp and strings.

Suite No. 3 (1932)Edit

Suite No. 3, P 172 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. (A note by the composer in the printed score states that the work may also be performed by a string quartet, completely omitting the double-bass part.) It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for Baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana(Fine sec. XVI) – Andantino)

Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec. XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)

Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana(Fine sec. XVI) – Andantino)

Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)

Piano reductionsEdit

The Ancient Airs and Dances first two suites were freely transcribed by the composer for piano (2 and 4 hands).

RecordingsEdit

There have been many recordings of the suites in their entirety, and individually, with Suite No. 3 most frequently appearing alone. Recordings include:

Philharmonia Hungarica, Antal Dorati (Mercury)

Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa (DG)

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Sir Neville Marriner (EMI)

Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, Jesús López-Cobos (Telarc)

Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Hugh Wolff (Teldec)

Australian Chamber Orchestra, Christopher Lyndon-Gee (Omega)

Sinfonia 21, Richard Hickox(Chandos)

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra (1 & 3 only) (DG)

Rome Symphony Orchestra, Francesco La Vecchia

Suite No. 3 onlyEdit

Berliner Philharmoniker, Herbert von Karajan (DG)

I Musici

I Solisti Italiani

Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Sir Neville Marriner (Philips)

English String Orchestra, William Boughton (Nimbus)

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

Antiche danze et arie per liuto, Suite No.1, Antiche danze et arie per liuto, Suite No.2, Antiche danze et arie per liuto, Suite No.3: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project (IMSLP)

Last edited 4 days ago by Ira Leviton

RELATED ARTICLES

Ottorino Respighi

Italian composer, musicologist and conductor

Jean-Baptiste Besard

French composer

Julia Sutton (dance historian)

American dance historian

Watch “Beethoven/Liszt: Symphony Op.68 No.6 “Pastoral” – Glenn Gould” on YouTube


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List of symphonies with names

While most symphonies have a number, many symphonies are known by their (nick)name.

This article lists symphonies that are numbered and have an additional nickname, and symphonies that are primarily known by their name and/or key. Also various compositions that contain “symphony” or “sinfonia” in their name are included, whether or not strictly speaking they adhere to the format of a classical symphony.

Sinfonia concertante is a different genre, and works of that genre are not included here, unless for those named works that are usually known as a symphony.

Composer No. Key Original name Translation Date Additional information
Alkan C minor–E-flat minor Symphonie pour piano seul Symphony for solo piano 1857 Numbers 4–7 of Douze Études dans tous les tons mineurs, Op. 39, for solo piano
Andriessen Symfonie voor losse snaren Symphony for Open Strings 1978
Atterberg 3 Västkustbilder West-Coast Images
Atterberg 4 Sinfonia piccola Little Symphony
Atterberg 5 Sinfonia funèbre Funereal Symphony
Atterberg 6 Dollar symphony
Atterberg 7 Sinfonia romantica Romantic Symphony
Atterberg 9 Sinfonia visionaria Visionary Symphony
Beethoven 3 E-flat major Eroica Heroic 1803–1804 Op. 55. Premiered 1805
see also List of works by Beethoven#Symphonies
Beethoven 5 C minor Schicksalssinfonie Fate Symphony 1804–1808 Op. 67. Premiered 1808
Beethoven 6 F major Pastorale Pastoral 1804–1808 Op. 68. Premiered 1808
Beethoven Siegessinfonie
Wellingtons Sieg oder die Schlacht bei Vittoria
Battle Symphony
Wellington’s Victory, or, the Battle of Vitoria
1813 Op. 91. Premiered 1813
for panharmoniconcommissioned by instrument’s inventor, later arranged for orchestra
Beethoven 9 D minor Choral 1817–1824 Op. 125. Premiered 1824
Bentoiu 6 Culori Colours 1985 Op. 28
Bentoiu 7 Volume Volumes 1986 Op. 29
Bentoiu 8 Imagini Images 1987 Op. 30
Berlioz Symphonie fantastique
Berlioz Harold en Italie Harold in Italy
Berlioz Roméo et Juliette Romeo and Juliet
Berlioz Grande symphonie funèbre et triomphale Funereal and Triumphal Symphony
Bernstein 1 Jeremiah
Bernstein 2 The Age of Anxiety
Bernstein 3 Kaddish
Berwald 1 Sérieuse Serious Symphony
Berwald 2 Capricieuse Capricious Symphony
Berwald 3 Singulière Singular Symphony
Berwald 4 Naïve
Bizet Roma Rome Symphony
Bliss A Colour Symphony
Borodin 2 Богатырская Симфония Symphony of Heroes nickname first used by Vladimir Stasov
Brahms 1 Beethoven’s Tenth nickname first used by Hans von Bülow
Brahms 3 suggested to be called “Heroic”, name rejected by Brahms
Brian 1 Gothic
Brian 2 Man in his Cosmic Loneliness
Brian 4 Das Siegeslied The Song of Victory
Brian 5 Wine of Summer
Brian 6 Sinfonia Tragica Tragic Symphony
Brian 22 Symphonia Brevis Short Symphony
Britten Simple Symphony
Britten Sinfonia da Requiem Requiem Symphony
Britten Spring Symphony
Britten Cello Symphony 1963 full title: Symphony for Cello and Orchestra
Op. 68. Premiered 1964
Brown The Northern Journey
Bruckner 00 00 student work written prior to No. 1
Bruckner 0 Nullte written after No. 1 and before No. 2
Bruckner 2 Symphony of Pauses
Bruckner 3 Wagner Symphony
Bruckner 4 Romantic
Bruckner 8 Apocalyptic the name is not used anymore
Chávez 1 Sinfonía de Antígona Symphony of Antigone
Chávez 2 Sinfonía india Indian Symphony
Chávez 4 Sinfonía romántica Romantic Symphony
Chávez Caballos de vapor: sinfonía de baile Horse Power: Dance Symphony 1926–1932
Chávez Llamadas: sinfonía proletaria Calls [to Arms]: Proletarian Symphony 1934
Clementi 3

Yoga: Namasté


Yoga: Namasté

Yoga: Namasté

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Protected: Yoga: love v like


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Lifestyle and health: Meditation and Braiwaves


Lifestyle and health: Meditation and Braiwaves

Lifestyle and health: Meditation and Braiwaves

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Brain: left v right hemisphere


Brain: left v right

Brain: left v right

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Horoscope♉: 11/14/2019


Horoscope♉:
11/14/2019

The source of your frustration may be people who seem to be sensitive and honest yet act abrasively and speak aggressively. Try not to be fooled by those who continuously offer one image while delivering another. Keep your guard up. Don’t waste your time giving people more chances than they deserve.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: St. Leopold’s Day


Today’s Holiday:
St. Leopold’s Day

St. Leopold (1073-1136), the patron saint of Austria, was buried in the abbey he had established in Klosterneuburg, Lower Austria. His feast day is observed there with the ceremony known as Fasselrutschen, or the Slide of the Great Cask, in the abbey’s wine cellar. Participants climb the narrow staircase that leads to the top of the cask and then slide down its smooth surface to a padded platform at its base. The faster the trip down, according to tradition, the better luck the person will have in the coming year. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Felix Frankfurter (1882)


Today’s Birthday:
Felix Frankfurter (1882)

Frankfurter was a US Supreme Court justice and presidential adviser. He served as secretary of war under President William H. Taft, advised President Woodrow Wilson at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, and advised President Franklin D. Roosevelt on many New Deal programs. In 1939, Roosevelt named him to the Supreme Court, where he served until 1962. In 1920, Frankfurter helped found the American Civil Liberties Union and argued in favor of what infamous pair of defendants? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Cornerstone of Jefferson Memorial Is Laid (1939)


This Day in History:
Cornerstone of Jefferson Memorial Is Laid (1939)

The construction of the Jefferson Memorial on the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC, was authorized by Congress in 1934. In 1939, US President Franklin Roosevelt presided over a ceremony during which the cornerstone of the monument was laid. Completed and dedicated in 1943, the white marble building, designed by John Russell Pope, is a circular structure with a domed ceiling, surrounded by 26 columns. Inside is a bronze statue of Jefferson. Why was a temporary plaster statue initially erected there? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Kate Wiggin


Quote of the Day:
Kate Wiggin

Having learned the trick of beating and loving and suffering, the poor faithful heart persisted, although it lived on memories and carried on its sentimental operations mostly in secret. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Head and Shoulders Above the Crowd


Article of the Day:
Head and Shoulders Above the Crowd

In the Spanish region of Catalonia, one tradition stands above all others: the building of castells—human towers. Traditionally built during festivals, these multi-tiered structures can contain as many as 10 levels, each composed of people linked together in a circle. This dangerous activity requires teamwork and planning. A tower is only considered complete once the final casteller has climbed to the top and extended one hand with four fingers raised in a gesture symbolizing what? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: Freudian slip


Idiom of the Day:
Freudian slip

Any inadvertent verbal or written mistake that reveals, or can be construed as revealing, an unconscious or repressed intention, belief, thought, attitude, etc. Named for the Sigmund Freud, considered the founding father of psychoanalysis, whose work largely focused on the unconscious and repressed elements of the human psyche. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: dramatist


Word of the Day:
dramatist

Definition: (noun) Someone who writes plays.

Synonyms: playwright

Usage: My goal as a dramatist is to have my plays live on long after I am gone.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Felix Mendelssohn


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Mendelssohn?wprov=sfla1

Felix Mendelssohn

This article is about the German musician. For other people with the same surname, see Mendelssohn (surname). For other uses, see Mendelssohn (disambiguation).

Stretching to the heart

Portrait of Mendelssohn by the English miniaturist James Warren Childe, 1839

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy[n 1] (3 February 1809 – 4 November 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn,[n 2] was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romanticperiod. Mendelssohn’s compositions include symphonies, concertos, pianomusic and chamber music. His best-known works include his overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the oratorioElijah, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. The melody for the Christmas carol “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” is also his. Mendelssohn’s Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions.
A grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Felix Mendelssohn was born into a prominent Jewish family. He was brought up without religion until the age of seven, when he was baptised as a Reformed Christian. Felix was recognised early as a musical prodigy, but his parents were cautious and did not seek to capitalise on his talent.
Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatory,[n 3] which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the Romantic era.

Life

Childhood

Felix Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas

Felix Mendelssohn was born on 3 February 1809, in Hamburg, at the time an independent city-state,[n 4] in the same house where, a year later, the dedicatee and first performer of his Violin Concerto, Ferdinand David, would be born.[4] Mendelssohn’s father, the banker Abraham Mendelssohn, was the son of the German Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, whose family was prominent in the German Jewish community.[5] Until his baptism at age seven, Mendelssohn was brought up largely without religion.[6] His mother, Lea Salomon, was a member of the Itzig family and a sister of Jakob Salomon Bartholdy.[7] Mendelssohn was the second of four children; his older sister Fanny also displayed exceptional and precocious musical talent.[8]
The family moved to Berlin in 1811, leaving Hamburg in disguise in fear of French reprisal for the Mendelssohn bank’s role in breaking Napoleon’s Continental System blockade.[9]Abraham and Lea Mendelssohn sought to give their children – Fanny, Felix, Paul and Rebecka – the best education possible. Fanny became a pianist well known in Berlin musical circles as a composer; originally Abraham had thought that she, rather than Felix, would be the more musical. But it was not considered proper, by either Abraham or Felix, for a woman to pursue a career in music, so she remained an active but non-professional musician.[10] Abraham was initially disinclined to allow Felix to follow a musical career until it became clear that he was seriously dedicated.[11]
Mendelssohn grew up in an intellectual environment. Frequent visitors to the salon organised by his parents at their home in Berlin included artists, musicians and scientists, among them Wilhelm and Alexander von Humboldt, and the mathematician Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet (whom Mendelssohn’s sister Rebecka would later marry).[12] The musician Sarah Rothenburg has written of the household that “Europe came to their living room”.[13]

Surname

Abraham Mendelssohn renounced the Jewish religion prior to Felix’s birth; he and his wife decided not to have Felix circumcised, in contravention of the Jewish tradition.[14] Felix and his siblings were first brought up without religious education, and were baptisedby a Reformed Church minister in 1816,[15] at which time Felix was given the additional names Jakob Ludwig. Abraham and his wife Lea were baptised in 1822, and formally adopted the surname Mendelssohn Bartholdy (which they had used since 1812) for themselves and for their children.[6] The name Bartholdy was added at the suggestion of Lea’s brother, Jakob Salomon Bartholdy, who had inherited a property of this name in Luisenstadt and adopted it as his own surname.[16] In an 1829 letter to Felix, Abraham explained that adopting the Bartholdy name was meant to demonstrate a decisive break with the traditions of his father Moses: “There can no more be a Christian Mendelssohn than there can be a Jewish Confucius”. (Letter to Felix of 8 July 1829).[17] On embarking on his musical career, Felix did not entirely drop the name Mendelssohn as Abraham had requested, but in deference to his father signed his letters and had his visiting cards printed using the form ‘Mendelssohn Bartholdy’.[18] In 1829, his sister Fanny wrote to him of “Bartholdy […] this name that we all dislike”.[19]

Career

Musical education

Mendelssohn began taking piano lessons from his mother when he was six, and at seven was tutored by Marie Bigot in Paris.[20] Later in Berlin, all four Mendelssohn children studied piano with Ludwig Berger, who was himself a former student of Muzio Clementi.[21] From at least May 1819 Mendelssohn (initially with his sister Fanny) studied counterpoint and composition with Carl Friedrich Zelterin Berlin.[22] This was an important influence on his future career. Zelter had almost certainly been recommended as a teacher by his aunt Sarah Levy, who had been a pupil of W. F. Bach and a patron of C. P. E. Bach. Sarah Levy displayed some talent as a keyboard player, and often played with Zelter’s orchestra at the Berliner Singakademie; she and the Mendelssohn family were among its leading patrons. Sarah had formed an important collection of Bach family manuscripts which she bequeathed to the Singakademie; Zelter, whose tastes in music were conservative, was also an admirer of the Bach tradition.[23] This undoubtedly played a significant part in forming Felix Mendelssohn’s musical tastes, as his works reflect this study of Baroqueand early classical music. His fuguesand chorales especially reflect a tonal clarity and use of counterpoint reminiscent of Johann Sebastian Bach, whose music influenced him deeply.[24]

Early maturity

First page of the manuscriptof Mendelssohn’s Octet (1825) (now in the US Library of Congress)

Mendelssohn probably made his first public concert appearance at the age of nine, when he participated in a chamber music concert accompanying a horn duo.[25] He was a prolific composer from an early age. As an adolescent, his works were often performed at home with a private orchestra for the associates of his wealthy parents amongst the intellectual elite of Berlin.[26] Between the ages of 12 and 14, Mendelssohn wrote 12 string symphonies for such concerts, and a number of chamber works.[27] His first work, a piano quartet, was published when he was 13. It was probably Abraham Mendelssohn who procured the publication of this quartet by the house of Schlesinger.[28] In 1824 the 15-year-old wrote his first symphonyfor full orchestra (in C minor, Op. 11).[29]
At age 16 Mendelssohn wrote his String Octet in E-flat major, a work which has been regarded as “mark[ing] the beginning of his maturity as a composer.”[30] This Octet and his Overture to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which he wrote a year later in 1826, are the best-known of his early works. (Later, in 1843, he also wrote incidental music for the play, including the famous “Wedding March”.) The Overture is perhaps the earliest example of a concert overture – that is, a piece not written deliberately to accompany a staged performance but to evoke a literary theme in performance on a concert platform; this was a genre which became a popular form in musical Romanticism.[31]
In 1824 Mendelssohn studied under the composer and piano virtuoso Ignaz Moscheles, who confessed in his diaries[32] that he had little to teach him. Moscheles and Mendelssohn became close colleagues and lifelong friends. The year 1827 saw the premiere – and sole performance in his lifetime – of Mendelssohn’s opera Die Hochzeit des Camacho. The failure of this production left him disinclined to venture into the genre again.[33]
Besides music, Mendelssohn’s education included art, literature, languages, and philosophy. He had a particular interest in classical literature[34] and translated Terence’s Andria for his tutor Heyse in 1825; Heyse was impressed and had it published in 1826 as a work of “his pupil, F****” [i.e. “Felix” (asterisks as provided in original text)].[35][n 5] This translation also qualified Mendelssohn to study at the Humboldt University of Berlin, where from 1826 to 1829 he attended lectures on aesthetics by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, on history by Eduard Gans.

Henry and June


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_%2526_June&ved=2ahUKEwilpafhzurlAhUzJzQIHVGgB2cQFjAXegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw2bFcuAeOD6bmD1bZv8thBt

Henry & June

This article is about the film based upon the book by Anaïs Nin. For other uses, see Henry and June (disambiguation).

Henry & June is a 1990 American biographical drama film directed by Philip Kaufman, and starring Fred Ward, Uma Thurman, and Maria de Medeiros. It is loosely based on Anaïs Nin’s French book of the same name, and tells the story of Nin’s relationship with Henry Miller and his wife, June.

Henry & June

Theatrical release poster

Directed byPhilip KaufmanProduced byPeter KaufmanWritten by

Philip KaufmanRose Kaufman

Starring

Fred WardUma ThurmanMaria de MedeirosRichard E. GrantKevin Spacey

CinematographyPhilippe RousselotEdited by

Dede AllenVivien Hillgrove GilliamWilliam S. Scharf

Production
company

Walrus & Associates

Distributed byUniversal Pictures

Release date

October 5, 1990

Running time

136 minutes[1]CountryUnited StatesLanguageEnglishBox office$23.5 million[2]

The film was nominated for Best Cinematography at the 63rd Academy Awards. It is one of three NC-17 films to receive Oscar nominations; the other films are Wild at Heart (1990) and Requiem for a Dream(2000).[3][4][5]

Plot synopsis

In 1931 in Paris, France, Anaïs Nin is in a stable relationship with her husband Hugo, but longs for more out of life. When Nin first meets Henry Miller, he is working on his first novel. Nin is drawn to Miller and his wife June, as well as their bohemian lifestyle. Nin becomes involved in the couple’s tormented relationship, having an affair with Miller and also pursuing June. Ultimately, Nin helps Miller to publish his novel, Tropic of Cancer, but catalyzes the Millers’ separation, while she returns to Hugo.

Cast

Fred Ward as Henry MillerUma Thurman as June MillerMaria de Medeiros as Anaïs NinRichard E. Grant as HugoKevin Spacey as Richard OsbornJean-Philippe Écoffey as Eduardo Sanchez (credit spelled as Ecoffey)Maurice Escargot (Gary Oldman) as PopArtus de Penguern as BrassaïLiz Hasse as JeanBrigitte Lahaie as Henry’s prostituteFéodor Atkine as Francisco Miralles Arnau

Soundtrack

The soundtrack was arranged by Mark Adler, consisting of period popular songs.

Jean Lenoir, “Parlez-moi d’amour” (Lucienne Boyer)Claude Debussy, Six épigraphes antiques: Pour l’égyptienne (Ensemble Musical de Paris)Francis Poulenc, “Les chemins de l’amour” (Ransom Wilson and Christopher O’Riley)Debussy, Petite Suite: “Ballet” (Aloys and Alfons Kontarsky)Harry Warren, “I Found a Million Dollar Baby” (Bing Crosby)Erik Satie, “Gnossienne No. 3” (Pascal Rogé)Satie, “Je te veux” (Jean-Pierre Armengaud)Debussy, “Sonata for Violin and Piano” (first movement) (Kyung-wha Chung and Radu Lupu)Frédéric Chopin, Nocturne No. 1 in C Major [sic] (Paul Crossley)Georges Auric, “Sous les toits de Paris” (Rene Nazels)Jacques Larmanjat, lyrics by Francis Carco, “Le doux caboulot” (Annie Fratellini)Debussy, “La plus que lente” (Josef Suk)”Je m’ennuie” (Mark Adler)”Coralia” (Mark Adler)Irving Mills, “St. James Infirmary Blues” (Mark Adler)Francisco Tárrega, “Gran Vals” (Francisco Tárrega)Joaquin Nin-Culmell, “Basque Song” (Joaquin Nin-Culmell)Vincent Scotto, lyrics by George Koger and H. Vama, “J’ai deux amours” (Josephine Baker)

Rating

Reception

See alsoEdit

Nudity in film

References

External links

Watch “Daniel Guichard – Les ballons rouges (Serge Lama)” on YouTube



Je n’ai pas eu de ballon rouge
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
Dans ces provinces où rien ne bouge
Tous mes ballons étaient crevés
Je n’ai pas eu de vrai vacances
Seul, face à face avec la mer
Quand le cœur rythme la cadence
Des mouettes qui nagent dans l’air

J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Je n’ai jamais joué aux billes
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
J’étais cloué dans ma famille
Comme un martyr à son bûcher
Je n’ai pas eu de promenade
Seul, face à face avec le vent
Je lisais le Marquis de Sade
Et j’aimais déjà les divans
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Les fées n’étaient pas du voyage
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
Elles vivaient de leurs avantages
Elles étaient toutes syndiquées
Je n’ai pas vu dans les étoiles
Le carrosse de Cendrillon
La mienne avait une robe sale
Mais elle n’avait pas de chaussons
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
J’ai rien donné, j’ai rien reçu
Pourtant j’avais déjà la chance
Quand j’étais gosse dans mon quartier
De ne pas attacher d’importance
A ce que les autres pensaient
Et je n’ai pas vu dans l’Histoire
Quelque guerrier ou quelque roi
Assoiffé de règne ou de gloire
Qui soit plus orgueilleux que moi
J’ai rien demandé, je n’ai rien eu
Mais j’ai fait ce que j’ai voulu
Translate to English

Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Serge Lama / Yves Gilbert
Les ballons rouges lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Watch “Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake – The Kirov Ballet” on YouTube


Swan Lake

This article is about the ballet. For other uses, see Swan Lake (disambiguation).

Swan Lake (Russian: Лебеди́ное о́зеро, romanized: Lebedínoye ózero), Op. 20, is a ballet composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1875–76. Despite its initial failure, it is now one of the most popular of all ballets.
The scenario, initially in two acts, was fashioned from Russian and German folk tales[a] and tells the story of Odette, a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer’s curse. The choreographer of the original production was Julius Reisinger(Václav Reisinger). The ballet was premiered by the Bolshoi Ballet on 4 March [O.S. 20 February] 1877[1][2] at the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. Although it is presented in many different versions, most ballet companies base their stagings both choreographically and musically on the 1895 revival of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov, first staged for the Imperial Ballet on 15 January 1895, at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg. For this revival, Tchaikovsky’s score was revised by the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatre’s chief conductor and composer Riccardo Drigo.[3]

History

Learn more

This section needs additional citations for verification.

Design by F. Gaanen for the décor of act 2, Moscow 1877

Origins of the ballet

There is no evidence to prove who wrote the original libretto, or where the idea for the plot came from. Russian and German folk tales have been proposed as possible sources, including “The White Duck” and “The Stolen Veil” by Johann Karl August Musäus, but both those tales differ significantly from the ballet.[4]
One theory is that the original choreographer, Julius Reisinger, who was a Bohemian (and therefore likely to be familiar with The Stolen Veil), created the story. Another theory is that it was written by Vladimir Petrovich Begichev, director of the Moscow Imperial Theatres at the time, possibly with Vasily Geltser, danseurof the Moscow Imperial Bolshoi Theatre (a surviving copy of the libretto bears his name). Since the first published libretto does not correspond with Tchaikovsky’s music in many places, one theory is that the first published version was written by a journalist after viewing initial rehearsals (new opera and ballet productions were always reported in the newspapers, along with their respective scenarios).
Some contemporaries of Tchaikovsky recalled the composer taking great interest in the life story of Bavarian King Ludwig II, whose life had supposedly been marked by the sign of Swan and could have been the prototype of the dreamer Prince Siegfried.[5] However, Ludwig’s death happened 10 years after the first performance of the ballet.
Begichev commissioned the score of Swan Lake from Tchaikovsky in May 1875 for 800 rubles. Tchaikovsky worked with only a basic outline from Julius Reisinger of the requirements for each dance.[6] However, unlike the instructions for the scores of The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, no written instruction is known to have survived.

Tchaikovsky’s influences

From around the time of the turn of the 19th century until the beginning of the 1890s, scores for ballets were almost always written by composers known as “specialists,” who were highly skilled at scoring the light, decorative, melodious, and rhythmically clear music that was at that time in vogue for ballet. Tchaikovsky studied the music of “specialists” such as the Italian Cesare Pugni and the Austrian Ludwig Minkus, before setting to work on Swan Lake.
Tchaikovsky had a rather negative opinion of the “specialist” ballet music until he studied it in detail, being impressed by the nearly limitless variety of infectious melodies their scores contained. Tchaikovsky most admired the ballet music of such composers as Léo Delibes, Adolphe Adam, and later, Riccardo Drigo. He would later write to his protégé, the composer Sergei Taneyev, “I listened to the Delibes ballet Sylvia … what charm, what elegance, what wealth of melody, rhythm, and harmony. I was ashamed, for if I had known of this music then, I would not have written Swan Lake.” Tchaikovsky most admired Adam’s 1844 score for Giselle, which used the Leitmotiftechnique: associating certain themes with certain characters or moods, a technique he would use in Swan Lake, and later, The Sleeping Beauty.
Tchaikovsky drew on previous compositions for his Swan Lake score. According to two of Tchaikovsky’s relatives – his nephew Yuri Lvovich Davydov and his niece Anna Meck-Davydova – the composer had earlier created a little ballet called The Lake of the Swans at their home in 1871. This ballet included the famous Leitmotif, the Swan’s Theme or Song of the Swans. He also made use of material from The Voyevoda, an opera he had abandoned in 1868. The Grand adage (a.k.a. the Love Duet) from the second scene of Swan Lake was fashioned from an aria from that opera, as was the Valse des fiancéesfrom the third scene. Another number which included a theme from The Voyevoda was the Entr’acte of the fourth scene.
By April 1876 the score was complete, and rehearsals began. Soon Reisinger began setting certain numbers aside that he dubbed “undanceable.” Reisinger even began choreographing dances to other composers’ music, but Tchaikovsky protested and his pieces were reinstated. Although the two artists were required to collaborate, each seemed to prefer working as independently of the other as possible.[7]

Composition process

Tchaikovsky’s excitement with Swan Lake is evident from the speed with which he composed: commissioned in the spring of 1875, the piece was created within one year. His letters to Sergei Taneyev from August 1875 indicate, however, that it was not only his excitement that compelled him to create it so quickly but his wish to finish it as soon as possible, so as to allow him to start on an opera. Respectively, he created scores of the first three numbers of the ballet, then the orchestration in the fall and winter, and was still struggling with the instrumentation in the spring. By April 1876, the work was complete. Tchaikovsky’s mention of a draft suggests the presence of some sort of abstract but no such draft has ever been seen. Tchaikovsky wrote various letters to friends expressing his longstanding desire to work with this type of music, and his excitement concerning his current stimulating, albeit laborious task.[8]

Performance history

Adelaide Giuri as Odette and Mikhail Mordkin as Prince Siegfried in Aleksandr Gorsky’s staging of the Petipa/Ivanov Swan Lake for the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow, 1901. A young Vera Karalli is seen kneeling.

Moscow première (world première)

Date: 4 March (OS 20 February) 1877

Place: Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow

Balletmaster: Julius Reisinger

Conductor: Stepan Ryabov

Scene Designers: Karl Valts (acts 2 & 4), Ivan Shangin (act 1), Karl Groppius (act 3)

St. Petersburg première

Date: 27 January 1895

Place: Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg

Balletmaster: Marius Petipa (acts 1 & 3), Lev Ivanov (acts 2 & 4)

Conductor: Riccardo Drigo

Scene Designers: Ivan Andreyev, Mikhail Bocharov, Henrich Levogt

Costume Designer: Yevgeni Ponomaryov[9]

Other notable productions

1880 and 1882, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Joseph Hansenafter Reisinger, conductor and designers as in première

1901, Moscow, Bolshoi Theatre, staged by Aleksandr Gorsky, conducted by Andrey Arends, scenes by Aleksandr Golovin (act 1), Konstantin Korovin (acts 2 & 4), N. Klodt (act 3)

1911, London, Ballets Russes, Sergei Diaghilev production, choreography by Michel Fokineafter Petipa–Ivanov, scenes by Golovin and Korovin

Original interpreters
RoleMoscow 1877Moscow 1880St. Petersburg 1895[9]Moscow 1901London 1911QueensopranoOlga NikolayevaGiuseppina CecchettiSiegfriedtenorVictor GillertAlfred BekefiPavel GerdtMikhail MordkinVaslav NijinskyBennoSergey NikitinAleksandr OblakovWolfgangWilhelm WannerGillertOdettePelageya KarpakovaYevdokiya KalmїkovaPierina LegnaniAdelaide GiuriMathilde KschessinskaVon RothbartSergey SokolovAleksey BulgakovK. KubakinOdilesopranoPierina LegnaniMathilde Kschessinska

Original production of 1877

The première on Friday, 4 March 1877, was given as a benefit performance for the ballerina Pelageya Karpakova (also known as Polina Karpakova), who performed the role of Odette, with première danseur Victor Gillert as Prince Siegfried. Karpakova may also have danced the part Odile, although it is believed the ballet originally called for two different dancers. It is now common practice for the same ballerina to dance both Odette and Odile.
The Russian ballerina Anna Sobeshchanskaya was originally cast as Odette, but was replaced when a governing official in Moscow complained about her, claiming she had accepted jewelry from him, only to then marry a fellow danseur and sell the pieces for cash.
The première was not well-received. Though there were a few critics who recognised the virtues of the score, most considered it to be far too complicated for ballet. It was labelled, “too noisy, too ‘Wagnerian’ and too symphonic.”[10] The critics also thought Reisinger’s choreography was “unimaginative and altogether unmemorable.”[10] The German origins of the story were “treated with suspicion while the tale itself was regarded as ‘stupid’ with unpronounceable surnames for its characters.”[10] Karpakova was a secondary soloist and “not particularly convincing.”[10]

The poverty of the production, meaning the décor and costumes, the absence of outstanding performers, the Balletmaster’s weakness of imagination, and, finally, the orchestra … all of this together permitted (Tchaikovsky) with good reason to cast the blame for the failure on others.

— Modest Tchaikovsky, brother of the composer

Yet the fact remains (and is too often omitted in accounts of this initial production) that this staging survived for six years with a total of 41 performances – many more than several other ballets from the repertoire of this theatre.[11]

Tchaikovsky pas de deux 1877

Anna Sobeshchanskaya [ru] as Odette in Julius Reisinger’s original production

Pierina Legnani as Odette (1895)

During the late 1880s and early 1890s, Petipa and Vsevolozhsky discussed with Tchaikovsky the possibility of reviving Swan Lake. However, Tchaikovsky died on 6 November 1893, just when plans to revive Swan Lake were beginning to come to fruition. It remains uncertain whether Tchaikovsky was prepared to revise the music for this revival. Whatever the case, as a result of Tchaikovsky’s death, Drigo was forced to revise the score himself, after receiving approval from Tchaikovsky’s younger brother, Modest. There are major differencesbetween Drigo’s and Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake score. Today, it is Riccardo Drigo’s revision of Tchaikovsky’s score, and not Tchaikovsky’s original score of 1877, that most ballet companies use.

Pavel Gerdt as Prince Siegfried (Mariinsky Theatre, 1895)

In February 1894, two memorial concerts planned by Vsevolozhsky were given in honor of Tchaikovsky. The production included the second act of Swan Lake, choreographed by Lev Ivanov, Second Balletmaster to the Imperial Ballet. Ivanov’s choreography for the memorial concert was unanimously hailed as wonderful.

The revival of Swan Lake was planned for Pierina Legnani‘s benefit performance in the 1894–1895 season. The death of Tsar Alexander III on 1 November 1894 and the ensuing period of official mourning brought all ballet performances and rehearsals to a close for some time, and as a result all efforts could be concentrated on the pre-production of the full revival of Swan Lake. Ivanov and Petipa collaborated on the production, with Ivanov retaining his dances for the second act while choreographing the fourth, with Petipa staging the first and third acts.

Modest Tchaikovsky was called upon to make changes to the ballet’s libretto, including the character of Odette changing from a fairy swan-maiden into a cursed mortal woman, the ballet’s villain changing from Odette’s stepmother to the magician von Rothbart, and the ballet’s finale: instead of the lovers simply drowning at the hand of Odette’s stepmother as in the original 1877 scenario, Odette commits suicide by drowning herself, with Prince Siegfried choosing to die as well, rather than live without her, and soon the lovers’ spirits are reunited in an apotheosis.[13] Aside from the revision of the libretto the ballet was changed from four acts to three—with act 2 becoming act 1, scene 2.

All was ready by the beginning of 1895 and the ballet had its première on Friday, 27 January. Pierina Legnani danced Odette/Odile, with Pavel Gerdtas Prince Siegfried, Alexei Bulgakov as Rothbart, and Alexander Oblakov as Benno. Most of the reviews in the St. Petersburg newspapers were positive.

Unlike the première of The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake did not dominate the repertory of the Mariinsky Theatre in its first season. It was given only sixteen performances between the première and the 1895–1896 season, and was not performed at all in 1897. Even more surprising, the ballet was performed only four times in 1898 and 1899. The ballet belonged solely to Legnani until she left St. Petersburg for her native Italy in 1901. After her departure, the ballet was taken over by Mathilde Kschessinskaya, who was as much celebrated in the rôle as was her Italian predecessor.

Later productions

Watch “Henry & June / Je M’Ennuie” on YouTube


“>Marlene Dietrich: Moi, Je M’Ennuie Lyrics

De ce que fut mon enfance
Je n’ai plus de souvenir
C’est peut-être que la chance
Ne m’offrit pas de plaisir
Et chaque jour qui se lève
Ne m’apporte aucun espoir
Je n’ai même pas de rêves
Quand luit l’étoile du soir

Moi je m’ennuie
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Je n’y peux rien
Le plaisir passe
Il me dépasse
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien
Partout je traîne
Comme une chaîne
Ma lourde peine
Sans autre bien
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Moi, je m’ennuie

Par de longs vagabondages
J’ai voulu griser mon cœur
Et souvent sur mon passage
J’ai vu naître des malheurs
Sur chaque nouvelle route
À l’amour j’ai du mentir
Et, le soir, lorsque j’écoute
La plainte du vent mourir

Moi j’ m’ennuie
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Je n’y peux rien
Le plaisir passe
Il me dépasse
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien
Partout je traîne
Comme une chaîne
Ma lourde peine
Sans autre bien
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie
Moi, je m’ennuie

Haiku: Blue skies at sunset (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)


Haiku: Blue skies at sunset (© poetic thought by GeorgeB @ euzicasa)

Blue skies at sunset

Proceed starry nights throughout,

Sunny days to come.

ESL: PREPOSITIONS IN ENGLISH (AT, IN, ON)


ESL: PREPOSITIONS IN ENGLISH (AT, IN, ON)

ESL: PREPOSITIONS IN ENGLISH (AT, IN, ON)

https://pin.it/3y33kd5g2ph2by

Horoscope♉: 11/13/2019


Horoscope♉:
11/13/2019

Communication with your romantic partner could be more psychic than verbal today, although the conversation should be heartfelt, honest, and gratifying. You’ll share your feelings as well as ideas gained from reading. The subject of traveling together may come up. A stronger sense of unity and understanding could result. Make the most of it.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: Plebeian Games


Today’s Holiday:
Plebeian Games

The Roman leader Flaminius is thought to have instituted the Plebeian Games in 220 BCE. They originally may have been held in the Circus Flaminius, which he built. Later, they may have moved to the Circus Maximus, a huge open arena between the Palatine and Aventine hills. The Games were dedicated to Jupiter, one of whose feast days was November 13, and included horse and chariot races and contests that involved running, boxing and wrestling. The first nine days of the festival (November 4-12) were devoted to theatrical performances. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Aaron Copland (1900)


Today’s Birthday:
Aaron Copland (1900)

Famously public-spirited and generous, Copland came to be unofficially regarded as the US’s national composer. Although his earliest works show European influences, the American character of the greater part of his compositions is evident in his use of jazz and American folk tunes. He is best known for his three ballets based on American folk material: Billy the Kid, Rodeo, and Appalachian Spring, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize. For what films did Copland compose music? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: The Apalachin Meeting (1957)


This Day in History:
The Apalachin Meeting (1957)

The Apalachin Meeting was a summit of some 100 Mafiosi from the US, Canada, and Italy that was raided after their fancy cars and out-of-state license plates aroused the suspicions of law enforcement agents in Apalachin, New York. Fifty-eight Mafiosi, including bosses Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese, were detained. Perhaps the most significant consequence of the raid was that it confirmed the American Mafia’s existence, a fact that had long been denied by what prominent law enforcement official? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: W. Somerset Maugham


Quote of the Day:
W. Somerset Maugham

There are two good things in life, freedom of thought and freedom of action. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: Tomb KV62


Article of the Day:
Tomb KV62

Tomb KV62 is the tomb of Tutankhamen, a 14th-century BCE Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. Because his name was stricken from the royal lists during the 19th dynasty, his tomb’s location was forgotten until 1922, when Howard Carter discovered it in the Valley of the Kings. Carter and his patron were the first people to enter the tomb in over 3000 years, and the objects they found inside afforded a new store of knowledge on Egyptian sculpture and life. What were some of the tomb’s treasures? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Idiom of the Day: fresh-faced


Idiom of the Day:
fresh-faced

Of or having an appearance of health, vitality, and/or youthfulness. Watch the video…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Word of the Day: inadvertent


Word of the Day:
inadvertent

Definition: (adjective) Happening by chance or unexpectedly or unintentionally.

Synonyms: accidental

Usage: An autobiography, when confronted by a careful editor with documentary evidence, is usually found to be full of obviously inadvertent errors.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Watch “Dvorak – String Quintet No 3 In E flat Major, Opus 97, B 180 “American”” on YouTube


Watch “Khachaturian – Adagio from Spartacus” on YouTube


Watch “Mahler: Adagietto Symphony 5 – Karajan*” on YouTube


From Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No.5%28Mahler%29?wprov=sfla1

Symphony No. 5 by Gustav Mahlerwas composed in 1901 and 1902, mostly during the summer months at Mahler’s holiday cottage at Maiernigg. Among its most distinctive features are the trumpet solo that opens the work with a rhythmic motif similar to the opening of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, the horn solos in the third movement and the frequently performed Adagietto.
Symphony No. 5by Gustav Mahler

Gustav Mahler in 1907

Composed1901 – 1902:MaierniggPublished

1904 Edition Peters

1905 Edition Peters

1964 Eulenberg

2001 Edition Peters (critical edition)

Movements5PremiereDate18 October 1904LocationGürzenich [de], CologneConductorGustav MahlerPerformersGürzenich Orchestra Cologne
The musical canvas and emotional scope of the work, which lasts over an hour, are huge. The symphony is sometimes described as being in the key of C♯ minor since the first movement is in this key (the finale, however, is in D major).[1] Mahler objected to the label: “From the order of the movements (where the usual first movement now comes second) it is difficult to speak of a key for the ‘whole Symphony’, and to avoid misunderstandings the key should best be omitted.”[2]

Composition history

Mahler’s composing cottage in Maiernigg

Mahler wrote his fifth symphony during the summers of 1901 and 1902. In February 1901 Mahler had suffered a sudden major hemorrhageand his doctor later told him that he had come within an hour of bleeding to death. The composer spent quite a while recuperating. He moved into his own lakeside villa in the southern Austrian province of Carinthia in June 1901. Mahler was delighted with his newfound status as the owner of a grand villa. According to friends, he could hardly believe how far he had come from his humble beginnings. He was director of the Vienna Court Opera and the principal conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic. His own music was also starting to be successful. Later in 1901 he met Alma Schindler and by the time he returned to his summer villa in summer 1902, they were married and she was expecting their first child.
Symphonies Nos. 5, 6 and 7, which all belong to this period, have much in common and are markedly different from the first four, which all have strong links to vocal music. The middle symphonies, by contrast, are pure orchestral works and are, by Mahler’s standards, taut and lean.
Counterpoint also becomes a more important element in Mahler’s music from Symphony No. 5 onwards. The ability to write good counterpoint was highly cherished by Baroquecomposers and Johann Sebastian Bach is generally regarded as the greatest composer of contrapuntal music. Bach played an important part in Mahler’s musical life at this time. He subscribed to the edition of Bach’s collected works that was being published at the turn of the century, and later conducted and arranged works by Bach for performance. Mahler’s renewed interest in counterpoint can best be heard in the second, third and fifth movements of this symphony.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for large orchestra, consisting of the following:
Woodwinds
4 flutes (all doubling piccolos)3 oboes (3rd doubling cor anglais)3 B♭ and A clarinets (3rd doubling D clarinet and bass clarinet)3 bassoons (3rd doubling contrabassoon)
Brass
6 horns (solo horn in movement 3)4 trumpets3 trombonestuba
Percussion
4 timpanibass drumsnare drum (used only in movement 1)cymbalstrianglewhip (used only in movement 3)tam-tamglockenspiel
Strings
harp1st violins2nd violinsviolascellosdouble basses

Revisions of the score

The score appeared first in print in 1904 at Peters, Leipzig. A second “New Edition”, incorporating revisions that Mahler made in 1904, appeared in 1905. Final revisions made by Mahler in 1911 (by which time he had completed his 9th Symphony) did not appear until 1964 (ed. Ratz), when the score was republished in the Complete Edition of Mahler’s works. In 2001, Edition Peters published a further revised edition (ed. Reinhold Kubik) as part of the New Complete Critical Edition. This edition is the most accurate edition available so far.[according to whom?] Previous editions have now gone out of print.

Structure

The symphony is generally regarded as the most conventional symphony that he had yet written, but from such an unconventional composer it still had many peculiarities. It almost has a four movement structure, as the first two can easily be viewed as essentially a whole. The symphony also ends with a rondo, in the classical style. Some peculiarities are the funeral march that opens the piece and the Adagietto for harp and strings that contrasts with the complex orchestration of the other movements.
A performance of the symphony lasts around 70 minutes.
The work is in five movements, though Mahler grouped the movements into bigger parts:
Part I1. Trauermarsch (Funeral march). In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt (At a measured pace. Strict. Like a funeral procession.) C♯ minor2. Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter Vehemenz (Moving stormily, with the greatest vehemence) A minorPart II3. Scherzo. Kräftig, nicht zu schnell (Strong and not too fast) D majorPart III

  1. Adagietto. Sehr langsam (Very slow) F major5. Rondo-Finale. Allegro – Allegro giocoso. Frisch (Fresh) D major

Part I

  1. TrauermarschEdit

The trumpet solo at the opening of the first movement

is followed by a somber, funeral march (the primary theme).

The march is twice interrupted by a calmer secondary theme.

  1. Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter VehemenzEdit

Horoscope♉: 11/12/2019


Horoscope♉:
11/12/2019

You may experience some raw emotions today, which you should use as your ally instead of your enemy. Your heart may feel rather abused, so do what you can to gently care for it. Be careful of letting others get too close if they simply don’t know how to act around something so fragile and pure. Protect yourself.: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Holiday: Feast of St. Frances Cabrini


Today’s Holiday:
Feast of St. Frances Cabrini

The first American citizen to be proclaimed a saint of the Roman Catholic Church, Francesca Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917) was born in Italy. She founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart in 1880, and went on to establish orphanages, schools, and hospitals in many American cities, as well as in Europe and South America. She was canonized on July 7, 1946. Her feast day is commemorated in many places, but particularly at Mother Cabrini High School in New York City, in whose chapel she is buried, and at every establishment of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Today’s Birthday: Robert Louis Stevenson (1850)


Today’s Birthday:
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850)

Born in Scotland, Stevenson traveled frequently during his life, partly in search of better climates for his tuberculosis, which would eventually cause his death at age 44. In 1885, he published A Child’s Garden of Verses, one of the most influential children’s works of the 19th century. His immensely popular novels Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde were written over the course of just a few years. What is considered his unfinished masterpiece? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

This Day in History: Two Libyans Indicted for Pan Am 103 Attack (1991)


This Day in History:
Two Libyans Indicted for Pan Am 103 Attack (1991)

In 1991, after a three-year investigation, US and UK authorities announced indictments against two Libyan intelligence officials in connection with the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, which killed 270 people. During a trial held a decade later in the Netherlands, one of the defendants was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Whose presence on board the airplane has given rise to a number of conspiracy theories about the motivations behind the bombing? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Quote of the Day: Virginia Woolf


Quote of the Day:
Virginia Woolf

Money dignifies what is frivolous if unpaid for. More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch

Article of the Day: The Black Army of Hungary


Article of the Day:
The Black Army of Hungary

Elected king of Hungary in 1458 after a series of foreign rulers, Matthias Corvinus reigned for 32 years in what became a glorious period in Hungarian history. Matthias won a reputation as a crusader against the Ottomans. He conquered Moravia, Silesia, Lusatia, Vienna, Styria, Carinthia, and Carniola—successes largely due to his establishment of a standing army. Known as the Black Army of Hungary, it consisted of thousands of paid soldiers, including Hungarians as well as mercenaries from where? More…: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tfd.mobile.TfdSearch