Tag Archives: Cello Concerto No. 1 (Saint-Saëns)

Schumann: Pianotrio in g kl.t., op.110


Schumann: Pianotrio in g kl.t., op.110

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Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476): make music part of your life series


Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476)

Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis: make music part of your life series


Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis

HISTORIC PERFORMANCES: Saint-Saens Cello Concerto No.1 Op.33 In A Minor – Jacqueline Du pré


[youtube.com/watch?v=DZCPV9Q9Fz4]

 

Camille Saint-Saëns composed his Cello Concerto No. 1 in A minor, Op. 33 in 1872, when the composer was 37 years old. He wrote this work for the Belgian cellist, viola de gamba player and instrument maker Auguste Tolbecque. Tolbecque was part of a distinguished family of musicians closely associated with the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire, France’s leading concert society. The concerto was first performed on January 19, 1873 at a conservatoire concert with Tolbecque as soloist. This was considered a mark of Saint-Saëns’ growing acceptance by the French musical establishment.

Sir Donald Francis Tovey later wrote “Here, for once, is a violoncello concerto in which the solo instrument displays every register without the slightest difficulty in penetrating the orchestra.” Many composers, including Shostakovich and Rachmaninoff, considered this concerto to be the greatest of all cello concertos.

The work can be split into three different sections as follows:

  1. Allegro non troppo
    The concerto begins unusually. Instead of the traditional orchestral introduction, the piece begins with one short chord from the orchestra. The cello follows, stating the main motif. Soon, countermelodies flow from both the orchestra and soloist, at times the two playfully “calling and answering” each other.
  2. Allegretto con moto
    This turbulent opening movement leads into a brief but highly original minuet, in which the strings are muted, and which contains a cello cadenza.
  3. Tempo primo
    A restatement of the opening material from the first movement opens the finale. While Saint-Saëns uses the finale mainly as a recapitulation of earlier material, he concludes it with the introduction of an entirely new idea for the cello.

Saint-Saëns very often uses the solo cello here as a declamatory instrument. This keeps the soloist in the dramatic and musical foreground, the orchestra offering a shimmering backdrop. The music is tremendously demanding for soloists, especially in the fast third section. This difficulty has not stopped the concerto from becoming a favourite of the great virtuoso cellists.

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Fantastic Composer/Compositions: Saint-Saens Clarinet Sonata op. 167 in E flat major



Clarinet: Richard Hosford 
Piano: Jan Brown
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

 

“Saint-Saens” redirects here. For the commune in Haute-Normandie, see Saint-Saëns, Seine-Maritime.

Camille Saint-Saëns

Charles-Camille Saint-Saëns 

(French pronunciation: ​[ʃaʁl kamij sɛ̃sɑ̃s];9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composerorganistconductor, and pianist of the Romantic era. He is known especially for The Carnival of the AnimalsDanse macabreSamson and Delilah (Opera), Piano Concerto No. 2Cello Concerto No. 1HavanaiseIntroduction and Rondo Capriccioso, and his Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony).
Saint-Saëns was born in ParisFrance, on 9 October 1835. His father, a government clerk, died three months after his birth. He was raised by his mother, Clémence, with the assistance of her aunt, Charlotte Masson, who moved in. Masson introduced Saint-Saëns to the piano, and began giving him lessons on the instrument. At about this time, age two, Saint-Saëns was found to possess perfect pitch. His first composition, a little piece for the piano dated 22 March 1839, is now kept in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Saint-Saëns’s precocity was not limited to music. He learned to read and write by the age of three, and had some mastery of Latin by the age of seven.