Fabulous Performances: Sayaka Shoji – Tchaikovsky : Violin Concerto in D major op.35 (YouTube Viral – 2,429,203 [posted: Oct 14, 2011]



Sayaka Shoji is the first Japanese and youngest winner at the Paganini Competition in Genoa in 1999.
She was born into an artistic family and spent her childhood in Siena, Italy. She studied at Hochschule für Musik Köln under Zakhar Bron and graduated in 2004. Her other teachers have included Sashko Gawrillow, Uto Ughi and Shlomo Mintz.

Zubin Mehta has been her strong supporter. When Shoji auditioned for him in 2000, he immediately changed his schedule in order to make her first recording with the Israel Philharmonic possible in the following month, then invited her to perform with Bavarian State Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

New at euzicasa: Valentina Lisitsa – Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 12



[Quelle: Servus TV]

“The summer has finally arrived to Paris: balmy 30 degrees, sweaty tourists…. It is even more amazing that the moment music begins sounding all those people who a minute ago were hurrying along busily , those people suddenly stop in their tracks and dive into the magic of sound, like it was a cool pool. Enjoy this short report for http://www.streetpianos.com and next time you suddenly hear piano sounds on a hot summer day on a street – it’s not an aural mirage , it’s for real – come and join in !” Continue reading

WordPress.com: Should “Settings” Be Your Choice? (Please take part in this important survey)


I have recently experienced some unwanted activity on my website. To be more specific, some of the followers have associated with you too, my very welcome and followers.

In today’s world ,  I should think that the most fundamental right as a blog administrator would be to decides, upon revising the content who will, or not be approved to become your blogging family.
As I requested several times and through different avenues, WordPress.com so far dismissed my requests to implement Setting choices, allowing us to decide who will, or will not follow us, based upon subject matter, interests, language, and so many other valid criteria in existence here at WordPress.com.  

At this time WordPress.com has no way to allow us the choice of moderating access, compared to Twitter, or even Facebook.

I think that Twitter services have a direct, easy to use, friendly way of empowering a member to freedom of association, and everyone of us is entitled to, without having o ask WordPress.com administration to do that for us upon request (which as I said earlier does not work, or even worse to have to directly contact such followers, which is beneath me (at least).

Here is how Twitter deal with this issue, at a immediate action of the twitter user (highlighted in yellow): 

Twitter v. WordPress Settings

Twitter v. WordPress Settings

Following is a Poll (my first) asking for your input in this issue, and the question is:

“Should the administrator of a WordPress.com be allowed to decide upon the membership at their site?”

Should you need further clarification on this matter, please feel free to comment, before voting! 

Thank you Friends! (as you can see this is NOT about you, it is about us all, I am sure you can too see why

Following is one example for the reasons I requested that word.press.com, allow for administrators’ settings. It would save time, and allow one the peace and tranquility of not having to interact with unwitty profane and vulgar characters!

Phylospher's Stone

Phylospher’s Stone CURSING AND PROFANITY

Hello World!


Air bridge overheadWelcome to: euzicasa.wordpress.com 

        This website is about art, artists and the way some of them  have influenced my whole life.
If at times the content may seem nostalgic, is only when it resonate in quality, in message and in power to influence human knowledge of one’s feelings.
        I am reminded of the little time we have to meditate upon the beauty around us, in an infinity of forms.
It is a duty, I think to share values, like leaflets over a monotonous life, and troubled civilization, away from the roll of coins that cannot buy neither a soul, nor that which makes us human.
        So happy trails, and I hope you too will find something in theses pages that you’ll like to share with others.

Thank You Friends,

George. Continue reading

Danee Robinson – Debussy’s 1883 “Mandoline”, L 29 (The poem of Paul Verlaine)



Danee Robinson is gifted with a pure, soprano angelic voice. She is an evolving presence in the world of classical music, and is getting more and more attention in the world of music, from an ever larger audience. 

How to describe in words her presence in the universe that’s larger than any imagination, the universe of music:

‘I am therefore I sing’

I feel  her  message  throughout her musical career, in her album “Canto di Gioia” (Song of Joy) on stage, and in this beautiful interpretation of “Mandoline”, composed by Claude Debussy, in 1883, for piano and soloist on the poem of Paul Verlaine. A composition exuding youth, and its capacity of playfulness, freedom and happyness…Of love everlasting. Continue reading

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: JACKIE ROBINSON DAY


Jackie Robinson Day

Jackie Robinson Day is celebrated throughout Major League Baseball (MLB) in honor of Jackie Robinson, the first African American to play professional baseball in the MLB. On April 15, 1947, Robinson played his first professional game for the Brooklyn Dodgers. To commemorate Robinson’s achievements, activities are planned each year at all MLB stadiums on April 15th. Home teams coordinate activities for the tribute, which may include pre-game award presentations, special guests throwing the first pitch, prizes for fans, and appearances by other legendary baseball stars. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452)


Leonardo da Vinci (1452)

Da Vinci was an Italian painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist. His drawings depict subjects ranging from flying machines to caricatures

The Mona Lisa.

The Mona Lisa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

and are rendered with scientific precision and consummate artistry. Included among his works are intricate anatomical studies of humans, animals, and plants. The richness and originality of intellect expressed in his notebooks reveal one of the greatest minds of all time. Why are most of his journals written in mirror-image cursive? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: “Nearer My God To Thee” I SALONISTI


Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: RMS TITANIC SINKS (1912)


 

RMS Titanic

RMS Titanic (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

RMS Titanic Sinks (1912)

The Titanic was a massive ocean liner that was thought to be virtually unsinkable. The ship was on its maiden voyage and carrying more than 2,200 passengers and crew when it struck an iceberg on April 14, 1912, and sank early the next morning. More than 1,500 lives were lost in the disaster. In 1985, a team led by Robert Ballard and Jean-Louis Michel located theTitanic’s wreck on the ocean floor and made a discovery that shed light on how the ship sank. What was it? More… Discuss

45 survivor accounts. The final moments of RMS Titanic.

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: FIVE IS GOOD, BUT SEVEN MAY BE BETTER


 

 

English: Euler diagram representing the relati...

English: Euler diagram representing the relationship between (botanical) fruits and vegetables. Botanical fruits that are not vegetables are culinary fruits. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Five Is Good, But Seven May Be Better

 

Current dietary guidelines recommend that people consume a minimum of five servings of fruits andvegetables a day, but researchers say that number should be upped to seven. A study of more than 65,000 men and women shows that the risk of premature death decreases with increased fruit and vegetable consumption. Interestingly, fresh vegetables appear to provide the greatest benefit, followed by salad and then fruit.Canned fruit, meanwhile, actually appears to increase the risk of death, perhaps because it is packed in sugary syrup. More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: OAHU


Fishing on Oahu

Fishing on Oahu (Photo credit: Stuck in Customs)

Oahu

Two large volcanoes and the plain between them make up Oahu, the third largest and most densely populated Hawaiian island, nicknamed the “Gathering Place.” Honolulu, Hawaii’s state capital and main deepwater marine port, occupies the southeast end of the island, not far from Pearl Harbor, while the North Shore possesses some of the world’s most renowned surfing spots. Oahu draws around five million visitors each year. Instead of cardinal directions, locals use what terms to describe locations?More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

SAINT OF THE DAY April 14: ST. LYDWINE


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 14 Saint of the Day

ST. LYDWINE
April 14: St. Lydwine is the patroness of sickness Lydwine of Schiedam was … Read More

April
14
Enhanced by Zemanta

Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band ( Full Album Remastered 2009) – The Beatles


Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band ( Full Album Remastered 2009) – The Beatles

1. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band - 0:00
2. With a Little Help from My Friends - 2:02
3. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds - 4:46
4. Getting Better - 8:15
5. Fixing a Hole - 11:03
6. She’s Leaving Home - 13:39
7. Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite - 17:14
8. Within You Without You - 19:53
9. When I’m Sixty-Four - 24:57
10. Lovely Rita - 27:35
11. Good Morning Good Morning - 30:17
12. Sgt Pepper’s (Reprise) - 33:00
13. A Day in the Life - 34:20

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (often shortened to Sgt. Pepper) is the eighth studio album by the English rock band The Beatles, released on 1 June 1967 on the Parlophone label and produced by George Martin. The album is widely regarded as one of the greatest of all time, and has since been recognised as one of the most important albums in the history of popular music, including songs such as “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” and “A Day in the Life”. Recorded over a 129-day period beginning in December 1966, Sgt. Pepper saw the band developing the production techniques of their previous album, Revolver. Martin’s innovative and lavish production included the orchestra usage and hired musicians ordered by the band. Genres such as music hall, rock and roll, pop rock, and traditional Indian music are covered. The album cover art, by English pop artist Peter Blake, depicts the band posing in front of a collage of their favourite celebrities, and has been widely acclaimed and imitated.

From Wikipedia: The Grammy Award-winning album packaging was art-directed by Robert Fraser, designed by Peter Blake andJann Haworth, his wife and artistic partner, and photographed by Michael Cooper. It featured a colourful collage of life-sized cardboard models of famous people on the front of the album cover and the lyrics printed in full on the back cover, the first time this had been done on a rock LP.[147] In the guise of the Sgt. Pepper band, the Beatles, all mustachioed, were dressed in custom-made satin day-glo-coloured military-style outfits (Lennon inlime, Harrison in tangerine, McCartney in cyan, and Starr in magenta). The suits were conceived by the Beatles and manufactured by the theatrical costumer M. Berman Ltd. in London,[148] with some parts designed byManuel Cuevas.[149][150] Among the insignia on their uniforms are: MBE medals on McCartney’s and Harrison’s jackets, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom on Lennon’s right sleeve and an Ontario Provincial Police flash on McCartney’s sleeve.

The centre of the cover depicts the Beatles standing behind a drum skin, on which are painted the words of the album’s title. The skin was painted by fairground artist Joe Ephgrave.[151] In front of the drum skin is a series of flowers that spell out “Beatles”. A collage depicts around 60 famous people, including writers, musicians, film stars, and (at Harrison’s request) a number of Indian gurus. The final grouping included: Mahavatar BabajiIssy BonnMarlon BrandoLenny BruceLarry BellWallace BermanWilliam S. BurroughsLewis CarrollAleister CrowleyMarlene DietrichDiana DorsBob DylanW.C. FieldsSigmund FreudOliver HardyAldous Huxley,Carl Gustav JungStan LaurelT. E. LawrenceKarl MarxMarilyn MonroeSir Robert PeelEdgar Allan PoeKarlheinz StockhausenH. G. WellsMae WestOscar WildeShirley TempleParamahansa Yogananda and Yukteswar Giri.[152] Also included was the image of the original Beatles’ bassist, the late Stuart SutcliffePete Best said in a later NPR interview that Lennon borrowed family medals from his (Best’s) mother Mona for the shoot, on condition that he did not lose them. Adolf Hitlerand Jesus Christ were requested by Lennon, but ultimately they were left out.[153] Images from the session reveal that a cutout of Hitler was indeed produced and brought to the studio, but never incorporated into the final tableau. A photo also exists of a rejected cardboard printout with a cloth draped over its head; its identity is unknown. The final cost for the cover art was nearly £3,000 (equivalent to £46,104 today) an extravagant sum for a time when album covers would typically cost around £50.[154]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Blue Skies (gypsy jazz) – Gonzalo Bergara Quartet with Leah Z on vocals – Steve’s Live Music



Gypsy Jazz with the right balance of vocals and hot instrumentals, and above all rock steady driving rhythm. Thanks to Charlie and Steve for bringing this group through Atlanta.

Enhanced by Zemanta

“Blue Skies” performed by Nina Simone



“Blue Skies” performed by Nina Simone
Recording session: Live in Cologne at One World Music Festival, 7/22/1990

Enhanced by Zemanta

Blue Skies: Willie Nelson & Kenny Rogers



Willie Nelson and Kenny Rogers sing “Blue Skies” live from the NBC Kenny, Dolly and Willie special. I won a prime time Emmy for Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Variety or Music Series or a Special for my mix of this show.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4



The Queer Urban Orchestra, under the direction of Nolan Dresden, performs Dmitri Shostakovich’s Ballet Suite No. 4 at our Mysterium concert, March 20, 2011. The work is in three movements: I – Introduction and Variations; II – Waitz; and III – Scherzo.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Rachmaninov / Artur Rubinstein, 1947: Rhapsody On A Theme Of Paganini, Op. 43 – RCA Vinyl



From the LP shown above, issued in 1954. The recording you hear was made in 1947. Artur Rubinstein is soloist; Walter Susskind leads the Philharmonia Orchestra.

Note: Rubinstein hits a wrong note at the start of variation 19 (at about16:37). I would be interested to know if this error, for which at the time of this recording there was no technology to correct, has been edited in more recently produced CD versions of this performance.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Rachmaninoff’s Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa



Live footage from the recording session. London Symphony Orchestra , Michael Francis conducting. The recording is available now on Decca. Get yours today! :-)
iTunes: http://smarturl.it/paganinirhapsody
Amazon: http://smarturl.it/LisitsaPaganini

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Borrow trouble for yourself, if that’s your nature, but don’t lend it to your neighbors.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: PAN AMERICAN DAY


Pan American Day

The International Union of American Republics (now called the Pan American Union)—general secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS)—designated April 14 as Pan American Day in 1930. Although each member country holds its own celebration, it is at the Pan American Union building in Washington, D.C., that one of the largest observances takes place. Students from all over the Western Hemisphere travel to Washington where, against a backdrop of flags in the courtyard of the House of the Americas, they perform folk songs and dances. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ROD STEIGER (1925)


Rod Steiger (1925)

American actor Rod Steiger got his start in the 1950s and quickly made a name for himself in Hollywood. Over the course of the next five decades, he appeared in dozens of motion pictures. He was thrice nominated for an Academy Award and won once—for his portrayal of Sheriff Bill Gillespie in In the Heat of the Night. As a teen, Steiger ran away from home to join the US Navy during World War II, but later his refusal to glorify war led him to turn down the title role in what film? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: JOHN WILKES BOOTH SHOOTS LINCOLN (1865)


John Wilkes Booth Shoots Lincoln (1865)

Booth was an American actor and Confederate sympathizer who assassinated President Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theater in Washington, DC, during a performance of Our American Cousin. Shortly after 10 PM on April 14, 1865, Booth slipped into the presidential box unobserved, shot Lincoln in the head, and vaulted to the stage, breaking his leg in the process. According to witnesses, he then shouted “Sic semper tyrannis,” Virginia’s state motto. What does the Latin phrase mean?More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR SCREEN TIME


Keep an Eye on Your Screen Time

On average, according to a recent survey, adults spend nearly seven hours a day looking at various screens, and this could be putting them at increased risk of eye damage. Opticians are concerned that overexposure to the blue-violet light emitted by smartphonescomputer screens, tablets, TVs, and the like could increase people’s risk of developing macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in old age. While for many computers and mobile devices are an unavoidable part of modern life, opticians recommend we at least try to give our eyes regular breaks from looking at them. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: FIGURE SKATING


Figure Skating

Figure skating is a sporting event involving spins, jumps, and a variety of other moves, performed on ice, often to music. The skates used by figure skaters differ from those used in other ice-based sports, as they are designed to accommodate the specific movements common in this sort of skating. For example, they have a set of jagged teeth at the front of the blade that facilitate jumping. How has television played a role in the development of the rules of competitive figure skating? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ioana Radu – Primăvara a sosit (Romanta)


Enhanced by Zemanta

Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures



Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures
(Welcome to all the pleasures (An Ode for St. Cecilia’s Day), for soloists, chorus & instruments, Z. 339)

Welcome to All the Pleasures is one of the Odes written for the celebration of St. Cecilia’s Day byHenry Purcell. The libretto is by Christopher Fishburn. Purcell had been writing Odes for the Royal Family since 1680, but in 1683 the Musical Society of London commissioned him to write an ode in honor of the public celebration of the feast of St. Cecilia. The “Musical Society” was a group of amateur and professional musicians that had organized a festival for the “great patroness of music.” It was the first year of their festival and Purcell was their first commissioned composer. Purcell composed the work for three solo voices, chorus, four-part strings, and continuo. Formally, he produces a concerto grosso effect when he balances the trio of voices (concertino) against the chorus and orchestra (ripieno).

The opening symphony has two movements; one maestoso and the second vivace. The maestoso is full of suspensions and canonic entrances and has a full texture. The vivace is contrapuntal throughout. The words “Welcome to all the Pleasures” are set on imitative entrances. When each voice proclaims “Welcome!,” an echo of invitations is produced. “Hail Great Assembly” breaks out in fugal style. The movement ends with an instrumental ritornello.

Here the Deities Approve is a countertenor solo written over a three measure ground bass. The vocal line is lyrical and plastic; the countertenor soars above the rest of the ensemble. There follows a string ritornello. Throughout this ode Purcell uses instruments at least as much as the voices. While joys Celestial sets joys on dotted rhythmic figures, and places the word “Celestial” on a falling, augmented dotted figure. The effect is joyful and celestial. Then there follows an instrumental ritornello based on the dotted rhythmic theme. Purcell imitates and varies this theme within a highly contrapuntal texture.

Then Lift up your Voices features a solo and chorus. Again the chorus begins with imitative entrances, but eventually comes together in homophony. Afterwards there is a solo harpsichord interlude, which can be played extemporaneously, making for a beautiful respite from the rest of the ode. Beauty, thou scene of love is a beautiful tenor solo. The solo is in two sections, the first of which is repeated. The ritornello takes over the solo line from the tenor voice as Purcell sets it in an inventive four-part contrapuntal style.

In a consort of voices has a diatonic, joyful melody in E major, and adds a bright feeling to the movement. The tenor voice has a solo based on the opening theme, and soon the chorus enters canonically. One of the most striking aspects of this movement is Purcell’s setting of the name “Cecilia,” which he repeats many times in all the voices and registers. He sets the music to the sound of the word. He ends the piece by having the singers drop out one by one, starting with the treble voices. Finally the bass is left alone to quietly sing the final “Ce-cil-ia.”

Liana Brook Guberman, Soprano
Jenny Green, Soprano
Alexandra Lushtak, Soprano
Christopher Sokolowski, Tenor
Christian Zaremba, Bass 
Hudson Valley Chamber Singers,
Hudson Valley Singers,
NYMO Ensemble,
Anastasia Dedik, Harpsichord
Eu, Harpsichord, organ, direction

Enhanced by Zemanta

Franz Doppler – Duettino on Hungarian Themes, Op. 36 – Two Flutes & Piano



Franz Doppler – Duettino on Hungarian Themes, Op. 36 – Two Flutes & Piano
Uri Shoham and Yossi Arnheim, flutes, accompanied by Yoav Talmi, piano, perform Doppler’s Duettino on Hungarian Themes, Op. 36 in a live concert. At the time of this concert, Uri Shoham was Principal Flute and Yossi Arnheim was Assistant Principal of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. After 46 years of playing First Flute with the IPO, Uri Shoham retired in 1997. Since then, Yossi Arnheim has served as Principal Flute of the IPO.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Apr 13 – Homily: St. Martin I, Suffering in Faith



Apr 13 – Homily: St. Martin I, Suffering in Faith
Fr. Elias on the life of St. Martin I the last Pope to be martyred in 655. He suffered greatly and even complained but in a fruitful way.
Ave Maria! 
Mass: St. Martin I – Opt Mem – Form: OF
Readings: Saturday 2nd Week of Easter
1st: act 6:1-7
Resp: psa 33:1-2, 4-5, 18-19
Gsp: joh 6:16-21
To Download Audio go to http://airmaria.com?p=34919

    1.  

 

 

  • The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, or church of Santa Maria Maggiore, is the largest Catholic Marian church in Rome, Italy. Wikipedia

 

 

 

  • AddressPiazza di S. Maria Maggiore, 42, 00100 Roma, Italy

 

 

 

 

 

  • Phone+39 06 6988 6800

 

 

 

 

    1.  

 

  • Archbasilica of St. John Lateran
    Basilica in Rome, Italy

 

  • The Papal Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, commonly known as St. John Lateran’s Archbasilica, St. John Lateran’s Basilica, and just The Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Rome … Wikipedia

 

 

 

  • AddressPiazza di San Giovanni in Laterano, 4, Roma, Italy

 

 

 

 

  • Phone+39 06 6988 6433

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

SAINT OF THE DAY – APRIL 13: ST. MARTIN I


SAINT OF THE DAY
Catholic saints are holy people and human people who lived extraordinary lives. Each saint the Church honors responded to God’s invitation to use his or her unique gifts. God calls each one of us to be a saint. Click here to receive Saint of the Day in your email.

April 13
St. Martin I
(d. 655)
When Martin I became pope in 649, Constantinople was the capital of the Byzantine empire and the patriarch of Constantinople was the most influential Church leader in the eastern Christian world. The struggles that existed within the Church at that time were magnified by the close cooperation of emperor and patriarch.

A teaching, strongly supported in the East, held that Christ had no human will. Twice emperors had officially favored this position, Heraclius by publishing a formula of faith and Constans II by silencing the issue of one or two wills in Christ.

Shortly after assuming the office of the papacy (which he did without first being confirmed by the emperor), Martin held a council at the Lateran in which the imperial documents were censured, and in which the patriarch of Constantinople and two of his predecessors were condemned. Constans II, in response, tried first to turn bishops and people against the pope.

Failing in this and in an attempt to kill the pope, the emperor sent troops to Rome to seize Martin and to bring him back to Constantinople. Already in poor health, Martin offered no resistance, returned with the exarch Calliopas and was then submitted to various imprisonments, tortures and hardships. Although condemned to death and with some of the torture imposed already carried out, Martin was saved from execution by the pleas of a repentant Paul, patriarch of Constantinople, who was himself gravely ill.

Martin died shortly thereafter, tortures and cruel treatment having taken their toll. He is the last of the early popes to be venerated as a martyr.

Comment:

The real significance of the word martyr comes not from the dying but from the witnessing, which the word means in its derivation. People who are willing to give up everything, their most precious possessions, their very lives, put a supreme value on the cause or belief for which they sacrifice. Martyrdom, dying for the faith, is an incidental extreme to which some have had to go to manifest their belief in Christ. A living faith, a life that exemplifies Christ’s teaching throughout, and that in spite of difficulties, is required of all Christians. Martin might have cut corners as a way of easing his lot, to  make some accommodations with the civil rulers.

Quote:

The breviary of the Orthodox Church pays tribute to Martin: “Glorious definer of the Orthodox Faith…sacred chief of divine dogmas, unstained by error…true reprover of heresy…foundation of bishops, pillar of the Orthodox faith, teacher of religion…. Thou didst adorn the divine see of Peter, and since from this divine Rock, thou didst immovably defend the Church, so now thou art glorified with him.”

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: JEFFERSON’S BIRTHDAY


Jefferson’s Birthday

Unique among American presidents, Thomas Jefferson(1743-1826) was not only a statesman but a scholar, linguist, writer, philosopher, political theorist, architect, engineer, and farmer. In the United States, he is remembered primarily as the author in 1776 of the Declaration of Independence; he died on July 4, 1826, the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration. A birthday commemoration is held each year at Monticello, Jefferson’s home in Virginia, as well as at the Jefferson Memorial on the Mallin Washington, D.C. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Gustave Flaubert


Nothing is more humiliating than to see idiots succeed in enterprises we have failed in.

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

25 Parasites You Do Not Want To Be Infected With



25 Parasites You Do Not Want To Be Infected With: 

Tweet this video! - http://clicktotweet.com/5oZ1m

Some parasites are relatively harmless, some are annoying, and then there are those that will not only kill but literally suck your brains out while doing it. These are 25 parasites you do not want to be infected with.

https://twitter.com/list25
https://www.facebook.com/list25
http://list25.com

Check out the text version too! - http://list25.com/25-parasites-you-do…

Here’s a preview:

Sacculina Carcini
Ophiocordyceps unilateralis
Anisakis Simplex
Wolbachia
Chigoe Flea
Hymenoepimecis argyraphaga
Vandellia Cirrhosa
Trichomonas gallinae
Sand fly protozoans
Cymothoa Exigua
Trypanosoma
Toxoplasma Gondii
Cochliomyia Hominivorax
Horsehair Worm
Filarial Worm
Loa Loa
Clostridium Perfringens
Blood Flukes
Onchocerca Volvulus
Neisseria Meningitidis
Tsetse fly
Guinea Worm
Plasmodium
Naegleria Fowleri
Leucochloridium paradoxum

Enhanced by Zemanta

25 Most Famous Last Words Ever Uttered (YouTube)


Published on May 2, 2013 VIEWS: 482,894

Tweet this video! - http://clicktotweet.com/f27GV

It is believed that people tend to become the most honest when they are about to die. Some have even said that of all the words a man utters in his entire lifetime, it is what he says on his death bed that makes the most sense. Here is a list of the 25 most famous last words ever uttered by some of the most celebrated heroes, celebrities and political leaders in the course of history, as well as relatively brief accounts of why they said those words.

https://twitter.com/list25
https://www.facebook.com/list25
http://list25.com

Check out the text version too! - http://list25.com/25-most-famous-last…

Here’s a preview:

- Sir James Matthew Barrie – “I can’t sleep.”
- John Adams – “Thomas Jefferson…”
- Queen Marie Antoinette – “Pardon me, Sir, I did not do it on purpose.”
- Louisa May Alcott -”Is it not meningitis?”
- Mary Elizabeth Jenkins Surratt – “Please don’t let me fall.”
- James Donald French – “Hey fellas! How about this for a headline for tomorrow’s paper? French Fries!”
- John Quincy Adams – “This is the last of Earth! I am content!”
- Alexander the Great – “To the strongest!”
- John F. Kennedy – “No, you certainly can’t.”
- Alexander II – “Home to the palace to die.”
- Hector Hugh Munro – “Put out the bloody cigarette!”
- Salvador Allende – These are my last words, and I am certain that my sacrifice will not be in vain, I am certain that, at the very least, it will be a moral lesson that will punish felony, cowardice and treason.”
- Major John Andre – “I pray you to bear me witness that I meet my fate like a brave man.”
- James Brown – “I’m going away tonight.”
- Michael Faraday – “I shall be with Christ, and that is enough.”
- Joan Crawford – “Don’t you dare ask God to help me”
- Nostradamus – “Tomorrow, I shall no longer be here.”
- Jimmy L. Glass – “I’d rather be fishing.”
- Humphrey Bogart – “I should have never switched from Scotch to Martinis.”
- Jane Dornacker – “Hit the water, hit the water, hit the water!”
- Emperor Julian – “You have won, O Galilean.”
- Jessica Dubroff – “Do you hear the rain? Do you hear the rain?”
- Dominique Bouhours – “I am about to — or I am going to — die: either expression is correct.”
- Belinda Emmett – “Are you all right?”
- Aleister Crowley – “I am perplexed. Satan, get out!”

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SAMUEL BARCLAY BECKETT (1906)




Samuel Barclay Beckett (1906)

Irish-born playwright and novelist Samuel Beckett settled permanently in Paris in 1937 and thereafter adopted French as his primary literary language, though he went on to translate many of his works into English. Marked by minimal plot and action, existentialist ideas, and humor, the Nobel laureate‘s works typify the Theatre of the Absurd. His Waiting for Godot is a classic of the genre and brought him global acclaim. Why did his wife call his receipt of the Nobel Prize a “catastrophe”? More…Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: TIGER WOODS BECOMES YOUNGEST GOLFER TO WIN MASTERS TOURNAMENT (1997)


Tiger Woods Becomes Youngest Golfer to Win Masters Tournament (1997)

Despite recent personal problems that took him off the tour circuit for a time, Eldrick “Tiger” Woods is still considered one of the greatest golfers of all time. In 1997, at the age of 21, he became the youngest player ever to win the Masters Tournament—winning by a record margin of 12 strokes. That same year, he won five other PGA tournaments and became the youngest player ever ranked first in world golf competition. Woods coined the term “Cablinasian” to describe his ethnicity, which is what? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: SPINAL STIMULATION LETS PARALYZED PATIENTS MOVE THEIR LEGS AGAIN


Spinal Stimulation Lets Paralyzed Patients Move Their Legs Again

Four men who had been paralyzed from the chest down for more than two years regained the ability to voluntarily move their legs and feet after having an electrical deviceimplanted in their spines. Though the procedure did not restore their ability to walk, simply being able to control the movement of their once-paralyzed limbs has had far-reaching benefits both physical—increased muscle mass, improved bladder and sexual function—and psychological. It remains unclear why epidural stimulation has this effect, but researchers suspect it makes the lower spinal cord more excitable and therefore more receptive to signals from the brain. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: SNAKES


Snakes

Snakes are scaly, cold-blooded, carnivorous reptiles related to lizards. They tend to be limbless and move by muscular contraction. Though they have razor-sharp teeth, they do not chew their prey but instead swallow it whole with the help of a loosely attached jaw. Because their bodies are tubular, some paired organs must be staggered within the body, and one of the two lungs is generally non-functional and sometimes even absent. Why are snakes associated with healing and medicine? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: COSMONAUTS DAY


Cosmonauts Day

On April 12, 1961, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man to travel in outer space. April 12 was declared Cosmonauts Day in Gagarin’s honor. Official ceremonies on this day begin in the Moscow suburb of Korolyov, well known as the center of Russian rocket production, where officials and former cosmonauts lay flowers at a statue of Gagarin. The general public celebrates the day in a less formal manner: some place flowers at statues of Gagarin in various cities, while others attend space-themed art and film exhibitions. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Henry Fielding


A rich man without charity is a rogue; and perhaps it would be no difficult matter to prove that he is also a fool.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Henry Clay (1777)


Henry Clay (1777)

Clay, known as the “Great Compromiser,” was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. His multiple bids for the presidency all failed, but he was nevertheless extremely influential in US politics. He orchestrated the Missouri Compromise between free and slave states, and he attempted to strengthen the nation’s economy through his American System. Though he opposed slavery and favored emancipation, Clay only freed his own slaves upon what? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: HARRY TRUMAN BECOMES 33RD PRESIDENT OF THE US (1945)


Harry Truman Becomes 33rd President of the US (1945)

Truman was the 33rd president of the US. He is remembered for authorizing the use of atomic bombs against Japan and for his opposition to Communism. A Democrat who largely accepted the New Deal tradition, he presided over victory in World War II and the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. His administration also oversaw the beginning of the Cold War and the desegregation of the US armed forces. What famous headline ran in the Chicago Tribune the day after Truman won his second term? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: GET CHARGED UP IN NO TIME


Get Charged Up in No Time

Well, “no time” may be a slight exaggeration, but it is not too far off the mark. An Israeli start-up has developed a prototype smartphone battery that can be fully charged in just 30 seconds. Rather than use lithium or nickel like conventional batteries, this battery uses “nanodots,” tiny, self-assembling peptide nanocrystals discovered in the course of Alzheimer’s research 10 years ago. It will be several years before the quick-charging battery makes it to market. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: DUBAI


Dubai

Dubai is one of the seven emirates of the United Arab Emirates. It is also the name of the emirate’s main city. Dubai is distinct from the other emirates in that oil revenues account for only a small part of its gross domestic product, although they did play a key role in transforming the sheikhdom into the international trade, business, and travel hub it is today. In recent years, Dubai has also made headlines for its ambitious building projects and now boasts what record-breaking structures? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11, Sergiu Celibidache conducting



Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11
George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana nr.1
Sergiu Celibidache conducting
This is THE perfect one ! No other conductor/orchestra makes me feel it and live it like this.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Smetana, Kubelik:Great Compositions/Performances: Ma Vlast (From Bohemia’s Fields and Meadows, 4/6)



Smetana, Kubelik: Ma Vlast (From Bohemia‘s Fields and Meadows, 4/6)
IV: Z Ceskych Luhu a Haju (From Bohemia’s Fields and Meadows)
Bedrich Smetana, composer
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
Studio Recording, 1952 (Mercury Living Presence)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Smetana, Kubelik: Ma Vlast (The Moldau, 2/6)


From:  Ma Vlast:
II: Vltava (The Moldau)

Bedrich Smetana, composer
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
Studio Recording, 1952 (Mercury Living Presence)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Jascha Heifetz plays Wieniawski Polonaise No. 1 in D Major


Jascha Heifetz plays Wieniawski Polonaise No. 1 in D Major,
Op. 4.

Accompanist: Emanuel Bay

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Johannes Brahms – Intermezzo Op. 117 No. 1 in E flat major


The 3 Intermezzi Op. 117 were composed in 1892 and are among the best-loved and most popular of Brahms‘ autumnal late piano output. On a smaller and more intimate scale than the surrounding sets of Op. 116, Op. 118 and Op. 119, the composer described these pieces as “lullabies to my sorrows”. Here we find Brahms at his most tender and introspective, with only one outburst (in the third Intermezzo) of the characteristic Brahmsian fieryness. The Intermezzi were inspired by a Scottish poem from Herder’s Volkslieder, and bear this inscription:

Schlaf sanft mein Kind, schlaf sanft und Schön!
Mich dauert’s sehr, dich weinen sehn.

Sleep softly my child, sleep softly and well!
It hurts my heart to see you weeping. 

Piano: Idil Biret

Picture: Winter, Close of Day by George Innes

Enhanced by Zemanta

Vatican Radio: Fifth Sermon for Lent: St Gregory the Great on understanding scripture


Fifth Sermon for Lent: St Gregory the Great on understanding scripture


(Vatican Radio) Below please find the complete text of the fifth sermon for Lent delievered by Fr. Raniero Cantalamessa, OFMCAP, Preacher to the Papal Household delivered Friday April 11, 2014:

In our attempt to place ourselves under the teaching of the Fathers to give a new impetus and depth to our faith, we cannot omit a reflection on their way of reading the Word of God. It will be Pope St. Gregory the Great who will guide us to the “spiritual understanding” of the Scriptures and a renewed love for them. 
The same thing happened to Scripture in the modern world that happened to the person of Jesus. The quest for the exclusively historical and literal sense of the Bible, based on the same presuppositions that dominated during the last two centuries, led to results similar to those in the quest for a historical Jesus opposed to the Christ of faith. Jesus was reduced to being an extraordinary man, a great religious reformer, but nothing more. >>>>>>>>>>More

[Text from page http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2014/04/11/fifth_sermon_for_lent:_st_gregory_the_great_on_understanding_scripture/en1-789841
of the Vatican Radio website ]
Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S SAINTS: ST. MARGUERITE D’YOUVILLE April 11 (Foundress of the Sisters of Charity, the Grey Nuns of Canada)


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 11 Saint of the Day

ST. MARGUERITE D’YOUVILLE
April 11: Foundress of the Sisters of Charity, the Grey Nuns of Canada. … Read More

April
11

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: MASTERS GOLF TOURNAMENT


Masters Golf Tournament

Known to golf fans everywhere as The Masters, this annual tournament has been held at the exclusive Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia since it was first started there in 1934. The qualifying rounds are held on Thursday and Friday of the four-day tournament, and the top 44 finishers participate in the final round. In addition to the cash prize, the winner receives a trophy and a greenblazer. On the Tuesday night before the tournament, there is a Champions Dinner attended by past winners and hosted by the defending champion—all wearing their distinctive green jackets. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


The silliest woman can manage a clever man; but it needs a very clever woman to manage a fool.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LEO CALVIN ROSTEN (1908)


Leo Calvin Rosten (1908)

Rosten was an American teacher, screenwriter, and humorist. He is best remembered for his stories about a night-school “prodigy” named Hyman Kaplan, which debuted in The New Yorker in the 1930s and were later published in book form under a pseudonym. His The Joys of Yiddish is a humorous guide to the Yiddish language and Jewish culture. Rosten is quoted as having once said that “any man who hates dogs and babies can’t be all bad!” To whom was he referring when he made this remark? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta