Tag Archives: zubin mehta

Daniil Trifonov, Zubin Mehta – Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini: great compositions/performances


Daniil Trifonov, Zubin Mehta – Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini

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Brahms Tragische Ouvertüre – Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra [HD] (great compostions/performances)


Brahms Tragische Ouvertüre
Koninklijk Concertgebouworkest / Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra o.l.v. Daniele Gatti
3 oktober 2010 Concertgebouw Amsterdam

 

who’s who: Sayaka Shoji (庄司 紗矢香 Shōji Sayaka), Classical Violonist


Sayaka Shoji

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Sayaka Shoji in Strasbourg, February 2014.

Sayaka Shoji (庄司 紗矢香 Shōji Sayaka?, born 30 January 1983) is a Japanese classical violinist. She is the first Japanese and youngest winner (after Lenuta Ciulei) at the Paganini Competition in Genoa in 1999.

She was born into an artistic family (her mother is a painter, grandmother is a poet) and spent her childhood in Siena, Italy. She studied at Hochschule für Musik Köln under Zakhar Bron and graduated in 2004. Her other teachers have included Sashko Gawrillow, Uto Ughi and Shlomo Mintz.

Zubin Mehta has been her strong supporter. When Shoji auditioned for him in 2000, he immediately changed his schedule in order to make her first recording with the Israel Philharmonic possible in the following month, then invited her to perform with Bavarian State Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Since then many prominent orchestras have invited Shoji, including the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia and WDR Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Lorin Maazel, Yuri Temirkanov, Myung-whun Chung and Semyon Bychkov.

Discography

The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Conducted by Zubin Mehta
July 2000, Deutsche Grammophon
  • Louvre Recital
Itamar Golan, Piano
September 2001, Deutsche Grammophon
Itamar Golan, Piano
December 2003, Deutsche Grammophon
Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Conducted by Myung-Whun Chung
October 2005, Deutsche Grammophon
  • Beethoven Sonata 2&9
Gianluca Cascioli, Piano
2010 Deutsche Grammophon
  • Bach & Reger Solo Works
2011 Mirare

Sayaka Shoji records with Deutsche Grammophon and performs on the 1729 “Recamier” Stradivarius on loan from Ryuzo Ueno, Honorary Chairman, Ueno Fine Chemicals Industry, Ltd.

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great compositions/performances: Sayaka Shoji plays Brahms : Violin Concerto in D major op.77


One more song Concerto of Sayaka Shoji (Sayaka Shoji)’s.  Alan Gilbert (Alan Takeshi Gilbert) Conductor North German Radio Symphony Orchestra (NDR Sinfonieorchester Hamburg)
Sayaka Shoji is the first Japanese and youngest winner at the Paganini Competition in Genoa in 1999.

She was born into an artistic family and spent her childhood in Siena, Italy. She studied at Hochschule für Musik Köln under Zakhar Bron and graduated in 2004. Her other teachers have included Sashko Gawrillow, Uto Ughi and Shlomo Mintz.

Zubin Mehta has been her strong supporter. When Shoji auditioned for him in 2000, he immediately changed his schedule in order to make her first recording with the Israel Philharmonic possible in the following month, then invited her to perform with Bavarian State Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta


[youtube.com/watch?v=Lh6mDL-VwYw]

Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta

 

Capriccio espagnol, Op. 34, is the common Western title for an orchestral work based on Spanish folk melodies and written by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1887. Rimsky-Korsakov originally intended to write the work for a solo violin with orchestra, but later decided that a purely orchestral work would do better justice to the lively melodies. The Russian title is Каприччио на испанские темы (literally, Capriccio on Spanish Themes). The Capriccio consists of five movements and is scored for 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes (one doubling English horn), 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp and strings.[

Structure

The work has five movements, divided into two parts comprising the first three and the latter two movements respectively..

  1. The first movement, Alborada, is a festive and exciting dance, typically from traditional asturian music to celebrate the rising of the sun. It features the clarinet with two solos, and later features a solo violin with a solo similar to the clarinet’s.
  2. The second movement, Variazioni, begins with a melody in the horn section. Variations of this melody are then repeated by other instruments and sections of the orchestra.
  3. The third movement, Alborada, presents the same asturian dance as the first movement. The two movements are nearly identical, in fact, except that this movement has a different instrumentation and key.
  4. The fourth movement, Scena e canto gitano (“Scene and gypsy song”) opens with five cadenzas — first by the horns and trumpets, then solo violin, flute, clarinet, and harp — played over rolls on various percussion instruments. It is then followed by a dance in triple time leading attacca into the final movement.
  5. The fifth and final movement, Fandango asturiano, is also an energetic dance from the Asturias region of northern Spain. The piece ends with an even more rousing statement of the Alborada theme.

A complete performance of the Capriccio takes around 16 minutes

Use in film

  • Capriccio Espagnol, Op.34 is played during the opening credits and as the Spanish Carnaval background music during Josef von Sternberg‘s film The Devil Is a Woman (1935), credited on screen as ‘Music based on Rimsky-Korsakoff’s “Spanish Caprice” and Old Spanish Melodies’.
  • Excerpts were heard in the fictional 1947 biopic of Rimsky-Korsakov, Song of Scheherazade.
  • A recording by “Philharmonia Slavonica” featured in the film Brokeback Mountain (2006). The “Philharmonia Slavonica” is pseudonymous group that appears on a number of recordings of the bargain-record producer Alfred Scholz. The performances attributed to them are often by the Austrian Radio (ORF) Orchestra.
  • A recording by the Moscow Radio Symphony in the film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Daniil Trifonov, Zubin Mehta – Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini



Tel Aviv, 26.12.2011
Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a theme by Paganini
Daniil Trifonov (piano)
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, conductor Zubin Mehta

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Fabulous Performances: Sayaka Shoji – Tchaikovsky : Violin Concerto in D major op.35 (YouTube Viral – 2,429,203 [posted: Oct 14, 2011]


SOLD OUT! UNFORTUNATELY THIS VIDEO HAS BEEN DESIGNATED PRIVATE STATUS ON/BY YOUTUBE, RENDERING THE VIDEO UNWATCHABLE: WAY TO GO!


Sayaka Shoji is the first Japanese and youngest winner at the Paganini Competition in Genoa in 1999.
She was born into an artistic family and spent her childhood in Siena, Italy. She studied at Hochschule für Musik Köln under Zakhar Bron and graduated in 2004. Her other teachers have included Sashko Gawrillow, Uto Ughi and Shlomo Mintz.

Zubin Mehta has been her strong supporter. When Shoji auditioned for him in 2000, he immediately changed his schedule in order to make her first recording with the Israel Philharmonic possible in the following month, then invited her to perform with Bavarian State Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Today’s Birthday: VLADIMIR SAMOYLOVICH HOROWITZ (1903) – Rachmaninoff 3rd Concerto Mehta NYPO 1978


 

Vladimir Samoylovich Horowitz (1903)

A Russian-American virtuoso pianist, Horowitz made his debut in Russia at 17. Within years, he was touring internationally, with much success. He eventually settled in the US, where his extraordinary technical virtuosity made him one of the most popular pianists of his time. Always susceptible to nervous strain, in 1953 he decided to quit performing publicly. He returned to the stage in 1965 and occasionally thereafter until his death. Why did Horowitz’s father lie about his son’s birthday? More… Discuss

Horowwitz plays the Rachmaninov 3rd Piano Concerto in Avery Fisher Hall, New York, 1978 with Zubin Mehta ( His last recording ever of this concerto and maybe the last time he played it. Horowitz was 75 years old in this recording!!!)

 

Arthur Rubinstein plays Chopin: Concerto no. 2


The most astonishing music ever written, of a unique sensibility: Chopin, unique in every way!

Arthur Rubinstein is accompanied here by the Israel Philharmonic with Zubin Mehta at the Royal Festival Hall in London in 1968.

From Wikipedia: “The Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minorOp. 21, is a piano concerto composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. Chopin wrote the piece before he had finished his formal education, at around 20 years of age. It was first performed on 17 March 1830, in WarsawPoland, with the composer as soloist. It was the second of his piano concertos to be published (after the Piano Concerto No. 1), and so was designated as “No. 2”, even though it was written first.

The work contains the three movements typical of instrumental concertos of the period.

  1. Maestoso
  2. Larghetto
  3. Allegro vivace

What makes Chopin’s Op. 21 an early-Romantic concerto par excellence is the dominance of the piano part. After introducing the first movement, the orchestra cedes all responsibility for musical development to the piano; there is none of the true interplay of forces that is the mainstay of the classical concerto. The idea that Chopin is a poor orchestrator is an oft-flogged dead horse of music criticism; Berlioz, himself a master orchestrator, was harsh in his appraisal, calling Chopin’s treatment “nothing but a cold and useless accompaniment.” Again, the criticism seems moot. If Chopin treated the orchestra merely as a platter on which to serve the piano, it was because the genre demanded it.”

Indeed a concert for Piano and Orchestra, rather than the other way around: I personally think that an orchestra couldn’t serve for better company for a piano, than in this concert!