Daily Archives: September 21, 2011

Schostakovitch- Jazz Suite No 1, Adrian Florescu


The Suite for Jazz Orchestra No. 1 (commonly known as Jazz Suite No. 1) by Dmitri Shostakovich was composed in 1934. It has three movements:

  1. Waltz
  2. Polka
  3. Foxtrot

The suite is scored for 3 saxophones (soprano, alto and tenor), 2 trumpets, trombone, wood block, snare drum, cymbals, glockenspiel, xylophone, banjo, hawaiian guitar, piano, violin and double bass. The premiere was on March 24, 1934.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suite_for_Jazz_Orchestra_No._1_(Shostakovich

The following is Duke Ellington – Black And Tan Fantasy 1929 Arthur Whetsol plays the jungle style trumpet solos!

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Today’s Birthday: Gustav Holst – Saturn from “The Planets Suite” London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Richard Hickox


Gustav Holst was born on 21 September 1874 in Cheltenham, England, the first of two children to Adolph and Clara von Holst.

Adolph was an accomplished pianist who taught piano and practiced many hours during the day, much to the neglect of his wife, Clara, and their two children. Adolph’s family was of Swedish origin. One of his ancestors served as a court composer in Russia until he fell out of favor and exiled to Germany. Soon afterwards, the family emigrated to England. Holst’s mother, Clara, was a piano student of Adolph when first they met. Clara’s great – great grandmother was from Spain, where she had been an actress. She was soon married to an Irishman and moved to Ireland. Clara was sweet, gentle and unassuming but she was not very strong. She died soon after the birth of her second child, when Gustav was only eight.  (Continue reading at: http://www.gustavholst.info/biography/index.php?chapter=1)

Recuerdos de la Alhambra, by Francisco Terraga interpreted by Milos Karadaglic



Recuerdos de la Alhambra (Memories of the Alhambra) is a classical guitar piece composed in 1896 by Spanish composer and guitarist Francisco Tárrega[1]. He wrote it in Granada.

A virtuoso on his instrument, Tárrega was known as the “Sarasate of the guitar”. His repertoire included many original compositions for the guitar (Capricho Árabe, Danza Mora, et al) as well as guitar arrangements of works written for other instruments by composers such as Ludwig van Beethoven, Frédéric Chopin and Felix Mendelssohn. As with his friend Isaac Albéniz and many of their Spanish contemporaries, Tárrega had an interest in combining the prevailing Romantic trend in classical music with Spanish folk elements, which he did with Recuerdos de la Alhambra and his transcriptions for guitar of several of Albeniz’s piano pieces, notably the fiery Asturias (Leyenda).[2]

Recuerdos de la Alhambra shares a title with the Spanish language translation of Washington Irving’s 1832 book, Tales of the Alhambra, written during the author’s four-year stay in Spain. It contains extensive examples of the tremolo technique often performed by advanced classical guitarists.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recuerdos_de_la_Alhambra)

A word about Milos Karadaglic

Born in the small Balkan state of Montenegro, Miloš’s love-affair with the guitar began when he was eight, when his father played him a recording of Segovia making magic with Albeniz’s ‘Asturias’. Armed with the family’s dusty old guitar, Miloš enrolled at a specialist music school, where in six months he learned all its teachers had to impart.

He gave his first public performance at nine, entered (and won) his first national competition at eleven, on the same day won a singing competition in his home town. He became a star performer on television and radio, took guitar master-classes in Belgrade, and then, shortly after the end of the Balkan war, decided to try for a scholarship at London’s Royal Academy…

Miloš’s choices of solo repertoire as well as music for guitar and orchestra are guaranteed to appeal to all lovers of guitar, classical and non-classical alike.

Find out more at:

Find out more:
http://www.milosguitar.co.uk
http://www.facebook.com/milosguitar
http://www.youtube.com/milosguitarist

Our Sputtering Economy by the Numbers – Poverty Edition_ProPublica


Our Sputtering Economy by the Numbers - Poverty Edition_ProPublica

Our Sputtering Economy by the Numbers - Poverty Edition_ProPublica (To Read the entire story click anywhere on the picture!)

Bisphenol A (BPA): Toxic!


Bisphenol A (BPA) is an organic compound with two phenol functional groups. It is used to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, along with other applications.

Known to be estrogenic since the mid 1930s, concerns about the use of bisphenol A in consumer products were regularly reported in the news media in 2008 after several governments issued reports questioning its safety, prompting some retailers to remove products containing it from their shelves. A 2010 report from the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) raised further concerns regarding exposure of fetuses, infants and young children.[1] In September 2010, Canada became the first country to declare BPA as a toxic substance.[2][3] In the European Union and Canada, BPA use is banned in baby bottles.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bisphenol_A)

Kids’ – Soup Cans Contain BPA Toxins – Discovery News


Kids - Soup Cans Contain BPA Toxins

Kids - Soup Cans Contain BPA Toxins (click on the picture to read story at Discovery News)

Noise Pollution


Noise Pollution

Noise is a recognized form of pollution, but it is difficult to measure because the annoyance or discomfort it causes varies between individuals. There is evidence that hearing sensitivity among young Americans is decreasing because of exposure to noise, including overly amplified music. Apart from hearing loss, excessive noise can cause sleeplessness, ulcers, high blood pressure, and possibly heart disease. A 2005 study found that city residents are willing to pay how much for noise reduction? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: H. G. Wells (1866)


H. G. Wells (1866)

Wells was an English author whose early books exemplify the political and social beliefs of his time. Full of fantasy and fascinating pseudoscientific speculations, they include The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds. Although he is probably best remembered for his works of science fiction, he was also an imaginative social thinker who worked for many progressive causes. What novels did he write after he abandoned science fiction? More… Discuss

This Day in History: J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit is Published (1937)


J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit is Published (1937)

The Hobbit is a fantasy novel written by J.R.R. Tolkien, a professor of Anglo-Saxon and of English language and literature at Oxford University. Adapted from stories Tolkien told his kids, The Hobbit is recognized as a classic in children’s literature but also attracts adult readers. Its sequel, The Lord of the Rings, is one of the 20th century’s most popular and influential works of fantasy literature. What changes did Tolkien make to later editions of The Hobbit? More… Discuss