Daily Archives: February 16, 2014

Noam Chomsky “A People Centered Society” (2013)



Bridgewater, MANoam Chomsky will talk about social justice and a people-centered movements when he speaks on Thursday at the Unitarian Universalist Church.”

Organiser Michael Louis Ippolito of Bridgewater hopes Thursday’s talk also raises awareness of a movement to amend the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution which would abolish the legal personhood of corporate entities.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Make Music Part of Your Life: Schubert, Die Nacht D.983c (Krummacher)



SCHUBERTIADE 2013
In memory of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

Pietà, passioni e gioia: Lieder e canti corali”

Rossella Giacchero: soprano; Federico Tibone, piano; Coro da Camera di Torino diretto da Dario Tabbia; Olivia Manescalchi, voce narrante e aiuto regia.
Contributi video a cura di Davide Livermore. Realizzazione video: Marco Fantozzi.

Progetto di Erik Battaglia e Valentina Valente.

Torino, Unione Musicale, Teatro Vittoria, 12 Marzo 2013

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Ansamblul Ghiocelul din Avrig, la Buzias 2013. Vineri



Ansamblul artistic “Ghiocelul” din Avrig, Sibiu, a participat la Festivalul de Folclor “La izvor, la izvorele…!”, de la Buzias, in perioada 24-26 mai 2013. Spectacol sustinut la Iulius Mall din Timisoara.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ave Maria – Palestrina



Make Music Part of Your Life Series:  Ave Maria – Palestrina
The Schola Cantorum Sanctae Caeciliae is a Catholic choral group based in Rhode Island. The group is made up of eight singers, two to each voice range in four part music. 

This is a live recording from a concert given. August 31, 2012 at Our Lady of Good Help Church in Mapleville, RI.

Look us up on Facebook!
http://www.facebook.com/ScholaCantorumSanctaeCa­eciliae

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ensemble Passero – Adoramus te Christe von G.P. da Palestrina (1525-1594)



Adoramus te Christe von G.P. da Palestrina (1525-1594)
gesungen vom Ensemble Passero am 2. März 2013 in der Alten Kapelle zu Regensburg anlässlich des Konzertes “Glaube als Passion – Botschaften Papst Benedikts XVI. in Liedern”

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Maurice Ravel – Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, I-V



Valses nobles et sentimentales, for piano (or orchestra) (1911)

I. Modéré
II. Assez lent
III. Modéré
IV. Assez animé
V. Presque lent
VI. Assez vif
VII. Moins vif
VIII. Epilogue: Lent

Philharmonia Slavonica
H. Adolph

Maurice Ravel could be slightly obsessive in the way he allowed certain musical interests to reappear throughout his compositions. Two such interests were dance and the past, and in Valses nobles et sentimentales one can hear how Ravel was able to effectively fuse these two curiosities together. While Le Tombeau de Couperin was inspired by the eighteenth century, the Valses was oriented toward the nineteenth century. Written out of homage to Schubert’s piano piece of the same name, the composer declared that the work’s title, “indicates clearly enough my intention of composing a chain of waltzes following the example of Schubert. The virtuoso element that was the basis of Gaspard de la nuit is here replaced by a writing of greater clarity, which has the effect of sharpening the harmony as well as the outline of the music.” Ravel achieved his goal of clarity, as the waltzes were written using intense precision, sophistication, and technical flawlessness. 

Valses nobles et sentimentales contains eight waltzes presented in the following order: Modéré, Assez lent, Modéré, Assez animé, Presque lent, Assez vif, Moins vif, and the Epilogue. Originally written for solo piano, the waltzes stimulate but do not disturb, while displaying different aspects of Ravel’s imagination including pride, tenderness, and sentiment. The work was dedicated to Louis Aubert and it was he who gave the first performance on May 9, 1911, at a concert held by the Société Musicale Indépendante, where Schubert’s piece of the same name was also premiered. As a little game, the composers’ names were withheld, leaving the audience to guess who had written each piece. Audience suggestions included Eric Satie, Zoltán Kodály, and even a correct answer from Debussy, whose ears could not be fooled by the identifiable quality he appreciated. Even though several of Ravel’s friends confessed their dislike, others claimed to be strongly drawn to the piece. Tristan Klingsor commented that he was one among several who, “were immediately seduced by the music, and yet he had taken a lot of risks, at least for the period….He had taken the use of unresolved dissonances to its furthest point. What we now find very piquant was extremely daring at the time. The first bars of the Valses seemed quite extraordinary. Then, since there was nothing there that was not well thought-out, the ear quickly grew to enjoy these pseudo-‘wrong notes,’ and a glance at the score revealed that they had a proper harmonic justification.” 

As with Ma mère l’oye Ravel allowed only himself to alter Valses nobles et sentimentales through orchestration. He adapted the waltzes for the ballet Adélaïde ou Le langage des fleurs, for a performance by the troupe of Natasha Trouhanova, and it was premiered as an orchestral work on April 22, 1912, at the Théâtre du Châtelet. Some say that the ironic overtones of the Valses foreshadow the superb choreographic poem La Valse while confirming to audiences that dissonance was indeed an essential element of his musical style. [Allmusic.com]

Art by Antoine Blanchard

Enhanced by Zemanta
Image

time and date: new widget at euzicasa


TimeandDate

Presidents’ Day (Washington’s Birthday) in United States


George Washington statue in the Boston Public Garden

George Washington statue in the Boston Public Garden (one click away from the story)

TODAY’S SAINT ST. DANIEL


Image of St. Daniel

St. Daniel

Died in 309, He and four companions, Elias, Isaias, Jeremy and Samuel were Egyptians who visited Christians condemned to work in the mines of Cilicia during Maximus persecution, to comfort them. … continue reading

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Oscar Wilde


The basis of optimism is sheer terror.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

TODAY BIRTHDAY: GIAMBATTISTA BODONI (1740)


Giambattista Bodoni (1740)

As did many tradesmen of his day, Bodoni followed in his father’s footsteps, training from a young age to become a printer. He apprenticed at the press of the Vatican before assuming the management of the Royal Press of the duke of Parma in 1768. He paid little mind to the quality of text he printed, prizing typeface and layout above all else. By the 1780s, he was designing his own typefaces, some of which are still in use. What distinguished his typefaces from the “old style” of William CaslonMore… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: UK CALLS OFF THE TODDLERS’ TRUCE (1957)


UK Calls Off the Toddlers’ Truce (1957)

Today we are used to turning on the television at any hour of the day or night and having access to countless channels broadcasting all manner of program, but this was not always the case. In television’s early days, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was the UK’s sole public broadcaster; it started out with just one channel, and it cut its feed from 6PM to 7PM to accommodate parents putting their children to bed. What caused the BBC to eventually abandon the so-called Toddlers’ Truce?More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: PARENTS FAIL TO ADEQUATELY MONITOR KIDS ON MOBILE DEVICES


Parents Fail to Adequately Monitor Kids on Mobile Devices

A vast majority of English parents say they have spoken to their children about Internet safety when using mobile devices, but most still allow their children to usesmartphones and tablets unsupervised. Parents tend to be more lax when it comes to installing parental controlsand monitoring their children’s online activity on such devices, perhaps believing that mobile devices pose less of a risk to children than standard computers. In fact, according to a recent survey, nearly 20 percent of children admitted viewing something on a mobile device that they found to be upsetting. More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: PETER ABELARD


Peter Abelard

Abelard was a 12th-century French philosopher and teacher whose career was derailed by a scandalous relationship with a tutee named Heloise. After a son and a secret marriage, Abelard sent Heloise to a convent to protect her from her disapproving family. In response, her uncle had Abelard castrated. Heloise became an abbess, while Abelard sought refuge as a monk. After his first theological work was burned as heretical, he established a monastery and resumed teaching. What were his last words? More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta