Daily Archives: February 7, 2014

Saint of the Day for Saturday, February 8th, 2014


Saint of the Day for Saturday, February 8th, 2014

Image of St. Jerome Emiliani

Feastday: February 8
1481 – 1537

Jerome Emiliani lay chained in the dark dirty dungeon. Only a short time before he had been a military commander for Venice in charge of a fortress. He didn’t care much about God because he didn’t need him — he had his own strength and the strength of his soldiers and weapons. When Venice’s enemies, the League of Cambrai, captured the fortress, he was dragged off and imprisoned. There in the dungeon, Jerome decided to get rid of the chains that bound him. He let go of his worldly attachments and embraced God.

When he finally was able to escape, he hung his metal chains in the nearby church of Treviso — in gratitude not only for being freed from physical prison but from his spiritual dungeon as well.

After a short time as mayor of Treviso he returned his home inVenice where he studied for the priesthood. The war may have been over but it was followed by the famine and plague war’s devastation often brought. Thousands suffered in his beloved city. Jerome devoted himself to service again — this time, not to the military but the poor and suffering around him. He felt a special call to help the orphans who had no one to care for them. All the loved ones who would have protected them and comforted them had been taken by sickness or starvation. He would become their parent, their family.

Using his own money, he rented a house for the orphans, fed them, clothed them, and educated them. Part of his education was to give them the first known catechetical teaching by question and answer. But his constant devotion to the suffering put him in danger too and he fell ill from the plague himself. When he recovered, he had the ideal excuse to back away, but instead his illness seemed to take the last links of the chain from his soul. Once again he interpreted his suffering to be a sign of how little the ambitions of the world mattered.

He committed his whole life and all he owned to helping others. He founded orphanages in other cities, a hospital, and a shelter for prostitutes. This grew into a congregation of priests and brothers that was named after the place where they had a house: the Clerks Regular of Somascha. Although they spent time educating other young people, their primary work was always Jerome’s first love — helping orphans.

His final chains fell away when he again fell ill while taking care of the sick. He died in 1537 at the age of 56.

He is the patron saint of abandoned children and orphans.

More Saints of the Day

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ROYAL HOBART REGATTA


Royal Hobart Regatta

The Royal Hobart Regatta is an aquatic carnival that includes sailing, rowing, and swimming events, as well as fireworks and parades. It is a holiday in Tasmania, Australia, and is held on the Derwint River in early February during Australia’s summer seasonHobart is the capital of Tasmania, Australia’s southernmost state. A similar holiday in northern Tasmania is observed on the first Monday in November and is called Recreation Day. More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: AESOP-“You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil.”


You may share the labours of the great, but you will not share the spoil.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: IL GUERCINO (1591)


Il Guercino (1591)

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, better known as Il Guercino(“The Squinter”), was an Italian painter whose work had a profound impact on the development of 17th-century Baroque decoration. One of the outstanding draftsmen of his age, he was known for his frescoes, altarpieces, oils, and drawings. When he was 30, he was called to Rome by Pope Gregory XV and spent a productive two years there. Later, he moved to Bologna and was its leading painter until his death. How did he get his nickname? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE “DEVIL’S FOOTPRINTS” APPEAR IN DEVON, ENGLAND (1855)


The “Devil’s Footprints” Appear in Devon, England (1855)

In February 1855, the Devil, perhaps consumed with wanderlust, apparently took a 40- to 100-mile stroll across Devon, England. His outing might have passed unnoticed, except that it was snowing heavily at the time. When residents awoke, they were dismayed to find unusual cloven hoofprints all over the place—not just on the ground but also on obstacles like walls and even roofs. Of course, it is possible that something other than the Prince of Darkness made these tracks. What are some theories? More… Discuss

 

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NEWS: PEANUT ALLERGY TRIAL SUCCESS


Peanut Allergy Trial Success

When it comes to food allergiespeanut allergies are the most deadly, but perhaps not for long. A clinical trial involving 85 children with peanut allergies successfully increased the tolerance of 84% to five peanuts a day after six months. At the start of the trial, participants were given a daily dose of peanut protein powder equivalent to one 70th of a peanut, too little to initiate an allergic reaction. Over the course of the study, the dose was slowly increased under careful medical observation, desensitizing most of the children to small amounts of peanuts. More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: SUMMA THEOLOGICA


Summa Theologica

Summa Theologica was the first Christian attempt at a comprehensive theological system. Written by Thomas Aquinas—a 13th-century philosopher and a principal saint of the Catholic Church—it is a compendium of all the main teachings of the Church for the “instruction of beginners.” It addresses a range of topics including God, the creation of the world, morality, and the life of Christ. Though incomplete,Summa Theologica is Aquinas’s most important work. About how many pages is it? More… Discuss

 

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Leonard Cohen – Famous Blue Raincoat [live]


[youtube.com/watch?v=6AZwcbd3QIE]

O2 Arena, London, England
November 13, 2008

 

Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Cohen London 2009 live – If It Be Your Will


If it be your will,  Leonard Cohen(London 2009 – live) 

If it be your will 
That I speak no more 
And my voice be still 
As it was before 
I will speak no more 
I shall abide until 
I am spoken for 
If it be your will 
If it be your will 
That a voice be true 
From this broken hill 
I will sing to you 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 

If it be your will 
If there is a choice 
Let the rivers fill 
Let the hills rejoice 
Let your mercy spill 
On all these burning hearts in hell 
If it be your will 
To make us well 

And draw us near 
And bind us tight 
All your children here 
In their rags of light 
In our rags of light 
All dressed to kill 
And end this night 
If it be your will 

If it be your will

 

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Adventurer Account, by George-B


Adventurer Account, by George-B

I have been walking Northbound
until there was no mere North to go to
and then I took the opposite direction,
found myself upside down hanging by
the branches of the Southern tree…
I was by exhausted,
hungry,
unshaven…
So I took a long rest
next day
I started west, and kept at it, for a while
and then I hit a bump in the road
at Greenwich
and had to heal my foot…
Then I considered continuing my walk
same direction


Late that year I draw a conclusion

and build a house of red bricks,
a picket fence
a kidney bean pool
a tennis court
a trail with 5 flights of stairs, wooden,
to the sandy beach. 

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Incredible pics


Fake-food scandal revealed as tests show third of products mislabelled | World news | theguardian.com


Thinly sliced ham on a chopping boardFake-food scandal revealed as tests show third of products mislabelled | World news | theguardian.com.

Soci, Doga, Jocuri Olimpice


DrStoica / da-te-n blogul meu, te rog!

soci2În deschiderea Jocurilor Olimpice de Iarnă de la Soci, organizatorii au pregătit un moment coregrafic spectaculos pe valsul lui Eugen Doga, compozitor român din Basarabia pe care am avut extraordinara plăcere să-l întâlnesc personal în luna decembrie, la București. Un muzician, un erudit și un om de mare, de foarte mare excepție! E cel care a scris, printre altele, muzica pentru filmele “Șatra” și “Maria, Mirabela”. Un om care, prin vorbă și comportament, mi-a devenit model. E plăcut să ai modele ca el.

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 – Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 – Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 – Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 – Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 – Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 – Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 – Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 – Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 – Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 – Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 – Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 – Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 – Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 – Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 – Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 – Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 – Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 – Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 – Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 – Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

 

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)


Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world.

Compositions name list:

00:01 – Albinoni – Adagio in g minor
10:44 – Pachelbel – Canon in D major
16:55 – Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
22:59 – Carlos GardelPor una cabeza
30:03 – Dmitri Shostakovich – Waltz no 2
33:52 – Eugen Doga – Grammofon
36:20 – Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
40:40 – Johann Strauss IIVienna Blood Waltz
47:46 – Johann Strauss II – Voices of Spring Waltz
53:31 – Juventino Rosas – Over the Waves Waltz
59:20 – Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca
1:02:57 – Mozart – Symphony 40 No 1
1:09:16 – Mozart – Lacrimosa
1:12:36 – Nino Rota – Vito’s Waltz
1:15:28 – Nobuo Uematsu – Dance With the Balamb-Fish
1:19:08 – Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty Waltz
1:23:47 – Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Waltz
1:30:41 – Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers
1:37:05 – Mozart – Serenade No 13

 

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Most Beautiful Adagios by Elliot Goldenthal


“Some of my favourite Adagios by Elliot Goldenthal. Music from “Cobb” (1994), “Batman Forever” (1995), “Alien 3” (1992), “Titus” (1999), “Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within” (2001) and from the ballet “Othello” (1997).” -E.G.

Related articles

 

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New at euzicasa: WIDGET_Classic Cat: The Free Classical Music Directory (one click away)


WIDGET_Classic Cat: The Free Classical Music Directory (one click away)

WIDGET_Classic Cat: The Free Classical Music Directory (one click away)

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Great Compositions/Performance: Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky”, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky


A. Dvořák, Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky“, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky

1. Lento maestoso
2. Andante – Vivace non troppo
3. Andante moderato
4. Allegro
5. Lento maestoso – Vivace

David Oistrakh Violin
Lev Oborin Piano
Sviatoslav Knushevitsky Violoncello

 

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Great Compostions/Performances: Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens


Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens

(2008 Annual Concert at Glenn Gould Studio Toronto Soloist:Emily Pei’En Fan Conductor: Tony Fan with Chinese Artists Society of Toronto Youth Orchestra)

Saint-Saens: Later years

In 1886 Saint-Saëns debuted two of his most renowned compositions: The Carnival of the Animals andSymphony No. 3, dedicated to Franz Liszt, who died that year. That same year, however, Vincent d’Indyand his allies had Saint-Saëns removed from the Société Nationale de Musique. Two years later, Saint-Saëns’s mother died, driving the mourning composer away from France to the Canary Islands under the alias “Sannois”. Over the next several years he travelled around the world, visiting exotic locations in Europe, North Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. Saint-Saëns chronicled his travels in many popular books using his nom de plume, Sannois.

In 1908, he had the distinction of being the first celebrated composer to write a musical score to a motion picture, The Assassination of the Duke of Guise (L’assassinat du duc de Guise), directed by Charles Le Bargy and André Calmettes, adapted by Henri Lavedan, featuring actors of the Comédie Française. It was 18 minutes long, a considerable run time for the day.

In 1915, Saint-Saëns traveled to San Francisco, California and guest conducted the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, one of two world’s fairs celebrating the completion of the Panama Canal.

Saint-Saëns continued to write on musical, scientific and historical topics, travelling frequently before spending his last years in AlgiersAlgeria. In recognition of his accomplishments, the government of France awarded him the Légion d’honneur.

Saint-Saëns died of pneumonia on 16 December 1921 at the Hôtel de l’Oasis in Algiers. His body was repatriated to Paris, honoured by state funeral at La Madeleine, and interred at Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris.

Relationships with other composers

Saint-Saëns was either friend or enemy to some of Europe’s most distinguished musicians. He stayed close to Franz Liszt and maintained a fast friendship with his pupil Gabriel Fauré, who replaced him as organist and choirmaster when he retired. Additionally, he was a teacher and friend to Isidor Philipp, who headed the piano department at the Paris Conservatory for several decades and was a composer and editor of the music of many composers. But despite his strong advocacy of French music, Saint-Saëns openly despised many of his fellow-composers in France such as Franckd’Indy, and Massenet. Saint-Saëns also hated the music of Claude Debussy; he is reported to have told Pierre Lalo, music critic, and son of composer Édouard Lalo, “I have stayed in Paris to speak ill of Pelléas et Mélisande.” The personal animosity was mutual; Debussy quipped: “I have a horror of sentimentality, and I cannot forget that its name is Saint-Saëns.” On other occasions, however, Debussy acknowledged an admiration for Saint-Saëns’s musical talents.

Saint-Saëns had been an early champion of Richard Wagner‘s music in France, teaching his pieces during his tenure at the École Niedermeyer and premiering the March from Tannhäuser. He had stunned even Wagner himself when he sight-read the entire orchestral scores of LohengrinTristan und Isolde, andSiegfried, prompting Hans von Bülow to refer to him as, “the greatest musical mind” of the era. However, despite admitting appreciation for the power of Wagner’s work, Saint-Saëns defiantly stated that he was not an aficionado. In 1886, Saint-Saëns was punished for some particularly harsh and anti-German comments on the Paris production of Lohengrin by losing engagements and receiving negative reviews throughout Germany. Later, after World War I, Saint-Saëns angered both French and Germans with his inflammatory articles entitled Germanophilie, which ruthlessly attacked Wagner.[2]

Saint-Saëns edited Jean-Philippe Rameau‘s Pièces de clavecin, and published them in 1895 through Durand in Paris (re-printed by Dover in 1993).

On 29 May 1913, Saint-Saëns stormed out of the première of Igor Stravinsky‘s Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring), allegedly infuriated over what he considered the misuse of the bassoon in the ballet’s opening bars.

 

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New at euzicasa: Link-Widget_to_AllMusic: Try it now!


AllMusic (one click away)

AllMusic (one click away)

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Great compositions/Performances: Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez


Claude Debussy

Printemps, symphonic suite for chorus, piano & orchestra, L. 61

1. Tres Modere

Claude Debussy LOC 23688
2. Modere 
Pierre Boulez

From AllMusic

One of Debussy‘s assignments as a Prix de Rome scholar at the Villa Medici in 1887 was to send back to the Fine Arts Academy in France an orchestral score so his benefactors could judge his professional progress. All Debussy managed to turn in was a piano duet called Printemps, or “Spring”; he claimed that the full score, complete with humming chorus, had been destroyed in a fire. Not until 1913 did he get around to generating an orchestral version, and even then the work was assigned to Henri Büsser who, working from the keyboard original, had no access to any original choral material. In a nod to the music’s origins, Büsser included a prominent but not quite concertante keyboard part in the finished score.

The Academy committee found the piece to be excessively progressive, which in the late 1880s meant little more than Wagnerian in its chromaticism. (The committee’s condemnation includes the first recorded application of the term “Impressionism” to Debussy‘s music.) Only in the orchestration did the music begin to sound like mature, Impressionistic Debussy, that effect achieved through timbre rather than harmony. The composer said he intended to compose a work “of a particular color, covering as wide a range of sensations as possible.” Actually, in terms of sensations, Printemps is limited to two: yearning, giving way to relaxed happiness. Debussydescribed the music’s program as “the slow, laborious birth of beings and things in nature, and then their blossoming outward and upward, and finally a burst of joy at being reborn to new life.” Consequently, the piece falls into two movements, both at moderate tempo, and neither employ particularly straightforward or memorable melodic material; the emphasis is entirely on mood.

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Saint of the Day for Friday, February 7th, 2014: St. Mosses


Saint of the Day for Friday, February 7th, 2014: ST. MOSES

Image of St. Moses

St. Moses

Arab hermit and bishop who is called “the Apostle of the Saracens.” He lived in the desert regions of Syria and Egypt, caring for the local nomadic tribes. When the Romans imposed peace upon the … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

 

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Amid US-Russia tussle over Ukraine, a leaked tape of Victoria Nuland – CSMonitor.com


 

Amid US-Russia tussle over Ukraine, a leaked tape of Victoria Nuland – CSMonitor.com.

Sistine : Michelangelo’s David and Goliath


Sistine : Michelangelo’s David and Goliath.

L.A. rainstorm does little to quench region’s thirst – latimes.com [In LA is sunny even when it rains: there is always a rainbow somewhere! ]


L.A. rainstormL.A. rainstorm does little to quench region’s thirst – latimes.com.