This Day in the Yesteryear: WILLIAM HERSCHEL DISCOVERS URANUS (1781)

William Herschel Discovers Uranus (1781)

For many years, astronomers mistakenly believed that the planet Uranus, which is sometimes visible to the naked eye, was a star. Herschel, a German-born English astronomer, originally believed that it was a comet. It soon proved to be, indeed, a verifiable planet—the first to be discovered in modern times with the aid of a telescope. The planet was only named Uranus—for the Greek personification of heaven—after the original name of Herschel’s choosing proved unpopular. What was it? More… Discuss

 

2 responses to “This Day in the Yesteryear: WILLIAM HERSCHEL DISCOVERS URANUS (1781)

  1. This is fascinating… one of my best friends is one of the two last direct descendants of William Herschel… and I find it amazing that he made his own telescopes to do the work in astronomy that he did – along with his sister, who was the first woman to be admitted to the Royal Society

    Like

Leave a Reply: (What... You're shy?)

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s