Daily Archives: January 18, 2014

Debussy: Suite bergamasque – 3. Clair de lune (1890-1905)

Claude Debussy 
(1862 – 1918) 
Complete music for piano solo (in chronological order) 
Suite bergamasque – 3. Clair de lune (1890-1905)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An excerpt from “Clair de lune,” the third movement of the Suite bergamasque.

The Suite bergamasque (French pronunciation: ​[bɛʁɡamask]) is one of the most famous pianosuites by Claude Debussy. Debussy commenced the suite in 1890 at age 28, but he did not finish or publish it until 1905.[1]

The Suite bergamasque was first composed by Debussy around 1890, but was significantly revised just before its publication in 1905. It seems that by the time a publisher came to Debussy in order to cash in on his fame and have these pieces published, Debussy loathed the earlier piano style in which these pieces were written.[1] While it is not known how much of the Suite was written in 1890 and how much was written in 1905, it is clear that Debussy changed the names of at least two of the pieces. “Passepied” was called “Pavane”, and “Clair de lune” was originally titled “Promenade Sentimentale.” These names also come fromPaul Verlaine‘s poems.[1]


The Suite bergamasque consists of four movements:

  1. “Prélude”
  2. “Menuet”
  3. “Clair de lune”
  4. “Passepied”

The suite has been orchestrated by many composers, including André CapletLeopold Stokowski, and Lucien CaillietDimitri Tiomkin arranged “Clair de lune” for organ for his musical score for Warner Brothers’ 1956 film Giant.


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Great Composers/Performances: Nathaniel Mayfield plays Michael Haydn’s, Concerto in D for Baroque Trumpet

Michael Haydn‘s Concerto in D Major for Baroque Trumpet. Performed live in Concert by Nathaniel Mayfield in Montreal, Canada on Feb. 18, 2009
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Michael Haydn

Johann Michael Haydn (German: [ˈhaɪdən] ( listen); 14 September 1737 – 10 August 1806) was an Austriancomposer of the Classical period, the younger brother of Joseph Haydn.

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Great Performances: Wynton Marsalis: Joseph Haydn – Trumpet Concerto in E flat major

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Joseph Haydn‘s Concerto per il Clarino, (Hob.: VIIe/1) (Trumpet Concerto in E flat major) was written in 1796 for his long-time friend Anton Weidinger. Joseph Haydn was 64 years of age.


The work is composed in three movements (typical of a Classical period concerto), they are marked as followed:

  • I. Allegro (sonata)
  • II. Andante (sonata)
  • III. Allegro (rondo)

In addition to the solo trumpet, the concerto is scored for an orchestra consisting of strings, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 (presumably natural) trumpets (which generally play in support of the horns or timpani rather than the solo trumpet), and timpani.

Original instrument

Anton Weidinger developed a keyed trumpet which could play chromatically throughout its entire range. Before this, the trumpet was valveless and could only play a limited range of harmonic notes by altering the vibration of the lips; also called by the name of natural trumpet. Most of these harmonic notes were clustered in the higher registers, so previous trumpet concertos could only play melodically with the high register only (e.g., Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 2). Haydn’s concerto includes melodies in the middle and lower register, exploiting the capabilities of the new instrument.

There were attempts all over Europe around the mid-classical era to expand the range of the trumpet using valves, but Weidinger’s idea of drilling holes and covering them with flute-like keys was not a success as it had very poor sound quality. Thus the natural trumpet still had continual use in the classical orchestra while the keyed trumpet had barely any repertoire. The valved trumpets used today was first constructed and used in the 1830s.


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Jean Sibelius, Valse Triste (orch.Herbert von Karajan)

Fabulous Compositions/Great Performances: Weber Invitation to the Dance

April 2003- Weber, Invitation to the Dance

Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel returns to St. Petersburg, Russia to once again conduct the St. Petersburg Philharmonic for the 100th anniversary of the legendary Yevgeni Mravinsky. 

“He is, simply put, a master… There is an authority and authenticity in Maestro Tchivzhel’s music making that is indisputably commanding and communicative.”– Yo Yo Ma 



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Great Performances: Carl. Maria von. Weber – Concerto No.1, in F minor, Op.73 (Sabine Meyer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Carl Maria von Weber wrote his Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F minor, Op. 73 (J. 114) for the clarinettist Heinrich Bärmann in 1811. The piece is considered a gem in the instrument’s repertoire. It is written for clarinet in B♭. The work consists of three movements in the form of fast, slow, fast.


  1. Allegro in F minor modulating into A-flat major and later returning to F minor with a meter of 3/4
  2. Adagio ma non troppo in C major transforming into C minor and E flat major and afterward reverting to C major with a meter of 4/4
  3. RondoAllegretto in F major with a meter of 2/4


Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 horns, 2 trumpetstimpanistrings, and solo clarinet

Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (18 or 19 November 1786 – 5 June 1826[1]) was a Germancomposerconductorpianistguitarist[2] and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romanticschool.

Weber’s operas Der FreischützEuryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. Der Freischütz came to be regarded as the first German “nationalist” opera,Euryanthe developed the Leitmotif technique to a hitherto-unprecedented degree, while Oberon may have influenced Mendelssohn‘s music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and, at the same time, revealed Weber’s lifelong interest in the music of non-Western cultures. This interest was first manifested in Weber’sincidental music for Schiller‘s translation of Gozzi‘s Turandot, for which he used a Chinese melody, making him the first Western composer to use an Asian tune that was not of the pseudo-Turkish kind popularized by Mozart and others.

A brilliant pianist himself, Weber composed four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor, which influenced composers such as ChopinLiszt and Mendelssohn. The Konzertstückprovided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt’s, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra. Weber’s shorter piano pieces, such as the Invitation to the Dance, were later orchestrated byBerlioz, while his Polacca Brillante was later set for piano and orchestra by Liszt.

Weber compositions for woodwind instruments occupy an important place in the musical repertoire. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet, a duo concertante, and variations on a theme (posthumously), are regularly performed today. His Concertino for Horn and Orchestra requires the performer to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing—a technique known as “multiphonics“. His bassoon concerto and the Andante e Rondo ungarese (a reworking of a piece originally for viola and orchestra) are also popular with bassoonists.

Weber’s contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th-century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten ([Four] Temperaments on the Loss of a Lover). Weber was also notable as one of the first conductors to conduct without a piano or violin.

Weber’s orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers – Berlioz referred to him several times in hisTreatise on Instrumentation while Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument.

His operas influenced the work of later opera composers, especially in Germany, such as MarschnerMeyerbeer and Wagner, as well as several nationalist 19th-century composers such as Glinka. Homage has been paid to Weber by 20th-century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky,Mahler (who completed Weber’s unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber).

Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works.


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Great Composers/Compositions: Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich

Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft (Lively)
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (Scherzo) (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (not fast) (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (Solemn) (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft (Lively)

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, threetrombonestimpani and strings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

Biographical context

Throughout his life, Schumann explored a diversity of musical genres, including chambervocal, and symphonic music. Although Schumann wrote an incomplete G minor symphony as early as 1832-33 (of which the first movement was performed on two occasions to an unenthusiastic reception),[3]he only began seriously composing for the symphonic genre after receiving his wife’s encouragement in 1839.[4] Schumann gained quick success as a symphonic composer following his orchestral debut with his warmly-received First Symphony, which was composed in 1841 and premiered in Leipzig with Felix Mendelssohn conducting. By the end of his career Schumann had composed a total of four symphonies. Also in 1841 he finished the work which was later to be published as his Fourth Symphony. In 1845 he composed his C major Symphony, which was published in 1846 asNo. 2, and, in 1850, his Third Symphony. Therefore, the published numbering of the symphonies is not chronological. The reasoning for the “incorrect” numerical sequencing of the symphonies is because his Fourth Symphony was originally completed in 1841, but it was not well received at its Leipzig premiere. The lukewarm reception caused Schumann to withdraw the score and revise it ten years later in Düsseldorf. This final version was published in 1851 after the “Rhenish” Symphony was published


The same year that Schumann composed his Third Symphony, he completed his Cello Concerto op. 129 which was published four years later. Schumann was inspired to write this symphony after a trip to the Rhineland with his wife. This journey was a happy and peaceful trip with Clara which felt to them as if they were on a pilgrimage.[5] As a result of this trip, he incorporated elements of his journey and portrayed other experiences from his life in the music. The key of the symphony has been connected to Bach’s idea of E flat major and the Holy Trinity.[6]



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2012-08-12 Leonard Cohen, Gent: I can’t forget




“I Can’t Forget


I stumbled out of bed 
I got ready for the struggle 
I smoked a cigarette 
And I tightened up my gut 
I said this can’t be me 
Must be my double 
And I can’t forget, I can’t forget 
I can’t forget but I don’t remember what 
I’m burning up the road 
I’m heading down to Phoenix 
I got this old address 
Of someone that I knew 
It was high and fine and free 
Ah, you should have seen us 
And I can’t forget, I can’t forget 
I can’t forget but I don’t remember who 

I’ll be there today 
With a big bouquet of cactus 
I got this rig that runs on memories 
And I promise, cross my heart, 
They’ll never catch us 
But if they do, just tell them it was me 

Yeah I loved you all my life 
And that’s how I want to end it 
The summer’s almost gone 
The winter’s tuning up 
Yeah, the summer’s gone 
But a lot goes on forever 
And I can’t forget, I can’t forget 
I can’t forget but I don’t remember what

The Best of Leonard Cohen

The Best of Leonard Cohen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)



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Rufus Wainwright – Everybody Knows (From I’m Your Man) Twenty Five Answers to as Many Questions Nobody Asked!

Rufus Wainwright covers Everybody Knows of Leonard Cohen
(From I’m Your Man)


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Health Exchanges See Little Progress on Uninsured – WSJ.com

Early signals suggest the majority of the 2.2 million people who sought to enroll in private insurance through new marketplaces through Dec. 28 were previously covered elsewhere, raising questions about how swiftly this part of the health overhaul will be able to make a significant dent in the number of uninsured.

Insurers, brokers and consultants estimate at least two-thirds of those consumers previously bought their own coverage or were enrolled in employer-backed plans.

via Health Exchanges See Little Progress on Uninsured – WSJ.com.

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Ohhh Coffeeeee: LIFESTYLE The Chemistry of Good Coffee: The Syphon Method

LIFESTYLE The Chemistry of Good Coffee: The Syphon MethodLIFESTYLE

The Chemistry of Good Coffee: The Syphon Method



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Great Composers/Compositions: Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102

Dmitri Shostakovich
Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102

Dmitri Shostakovich, piano movements:

  1. Allegtro (A jolly main theme)
  2. Andante (The second movement is subdued and romantic)
  3. Allegro (The finale is a lively dance in duple time)

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
André Cluytens, conductor

From Wikipedia

Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102, by Dmitri Shostakovich was composed in 1957 for his son Maxim’s 19th birthday. Maxim premiered the piece during his graduation at the Moscow Conservatory. It is an uncharacteristically cheerful piece, much more so than most of Shostakovich’s works.
The work is scored for solo piano, three flutes (third doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four hornstimpanisnare drum andstrings.


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Great Composers/Compositions: Igor Bukhvalov – Symphony no. 8 in F-Dur, Op. 93 by Ludwig van Beethoven

Igor Bukhvalov conducts Belarusian National Philharmonic performing Symphony #8 in F-Dur ,Op. 93 By Ludwig van Beethoven:

The Eighth Symphony consists of four movements:


  1. Allegro vivace e con brio
  2. Allegretto scherzando
  3. Tempo di Menuetto
  4. Allegro vivace
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 The Symphony No. 8 in F MajorOp. 93 is a symphony in four movements composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1812. Beethoven fondly referred to it as “my little Symphony in F,” distinguishing it from his Sixth Symphony, a longer work also in F.[1]

The Eighth Symphony is generally light-hearted, though not lightweight, and in many places cheerfully loud, with many accented notes. Various passages in the symphony are heard by some listeners to be musical jokes.[2] As with various other Beethoven works such as the Opus 27 piano sonatas, the symphony deviates from Classical tradition in making the last movement the weightiest of the four.
The work was begun in the summer of 1812, immediately after the completion of the Seventh Symphony.[3]At the time Beethoven was 41 years old. As Antony Hopkins has noted, the cheerful mood of the work betrays nothing of the grossly unpleasant events that were taking place in Beethoven’s life at the time, which involved his interference in his brother Johann’s love life.[4] The work took Beethoven only four months to complete,[3] and is, unlike many of his works, without dedication.
The premiere took place on 24 February 1814, at a concert in the RedoutensaalVienna, at which theSeventh Symphony (which had been premiered two months earlier) was also played.[5] Beethoven was growing increasingly deaf at the time, but nevertheless led the premiere. Reportedly, “the orchestra largely ignored his ungainly gestures and followed the principal violinist instead.”[6]


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Reaction to Obama’s NSA speech ranges from lukewarm to skeptical – CSMonitor.com

Reaction to Obama’s NSA speech ranges from lukewarm to skeptical – CSMonitor.com.

Dr. John Noseworthy discusses the Future of Health Care

McCray (@tracymccray) published a blog post · January 17th, 2014

The Future of Health Care: Mayo Clinic Radio

On Saturday, Jan. 18, Mayo Clinic President and CEO John Noseworthy, M.D., joins the show to discuss the future of health care. How does the Affordable Care Act affect the future of health care? Does Mayo Clinic have a role and what responsibilities do patients and the government play? With a rapidly aging population, what challenges does Medicare face and how can those challenges be addressed? Below are video excerpts from the recorded conversation between Dr. Noseworthy and co-hosts Dr. Tom Shives and Tracy McCray. 


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The Future of Health Care: Mayo Clinic Radio « Mayo Clinic News Network

The Future of Health Care: Mayo Clinic Radio « Mayo Clinic News Network.

Four Questionable Claims Obama Has Made on NSA Surveillance – ProPublica

Four Questionable Claims Obama Has Made on NSA Surveillance – ProPublica.

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Obama’s Changes to Government Surveillance – NYTimes.com

English: In January 2009, President of the Uni...

Obama’s Changes to Government Surveillance – NYTimes.com.



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QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington ABOUT WORK

Nothing ever comes to me, that is worth having, except as the result of hard work.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

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Festival of St. Peter’s Chair

At the Vatican in RomeSt. Peter is honored as bishop of Rome and the first pope. The current pope, wearing his triple crown and vestments of gold cloth, is carried in his chair of state in a spectacular procession up the nave of St. Peter’s Basilica. He is deposited behind the altar on a richly decorated throne that enshrines the plain wooden chair on which St. Peter is believed to have sat. The ceremony dates back to at least 720 and is regarded as one of the most magnificent ecclesiastical observances to be held at St. Peter’s. More… Discuss
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Peter Mark Roget (1779)

If you have ever used a thesaurus, you have Roget to thank. He was an English physician who created not only the Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases—a comprehensive classification of synonyms that he published in 1852 during his retirement—but also a slide rule for calculating the roots and powers of numbers. Roget was an obsessive list-maker, and it has been speculated that he worked on the thesaurus to combat depressive tendencies. What institution did Roget help to establish? More… Discuss


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The Twenty-One Demands (1915)

Japan gained a large sphere of interest in northern China through its victories in the First Sino-Japanese War and the Russo-Japanese War, thus joining the ranks of the European imperialist powers scrambling to establish control over China. Japan used its 1914 declaration of war against Germany as grounds for invading German holdings in China. Then, ignoring the Chinese request to withdraw, Japan secretly presented the Chinese president with an ultimatum. What were some of the demands? More… Discuss


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South African Hospitals Sending Home Patients with Deadly TB

Researchers have identified an alarming practice in South Africa that is contributing to the spread ofextensively-drug resistant (XDR) and totally drug-resistant (TDR) tuberculosis. When patients with these highly drug-resistant strains of TB do not respond totreatment, South African hospitals routinely discharge them and allow them to return to their homes, where they may expose relatives and other members of their communities to the disease. The problem is that doctors need to free up beds in TB hospitals for patients who may respond to treatment, but there are few residential or palliative care facilities to accept the patients they discharge. More… Discuss


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The Steam Donkey

The steam donkey is the strangely named auxiliary steam engine used for hoisting or pumping, especially on a ship. The name “steam donkey” comes from its origin in sailing ships, where the “donkey” engine was typically used to load and unload cargo and raise the larger sails. Patented in 1882, the steam donkey became a key tool for the logging industry as well, but its popularity waned with the advent of diesel-powered equipment. At what amusement park can you find a steam donkey on display? More… Discuss


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