Daily Archives: January 1, 2015

From France 24: New Year’s Eve stampede kills 36 in Shanghai


New Year’s Eve stampede kills 36 in Shanghai

http://f24.my/1BmKhvO

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From France. 24: In pictures: World welcomes 2015


In pictures: World welcomes 2015

http://f24.my/1x7ru8N

From France. 24: Sex, style and a happy New Year at Paris’s Crazy Horse


Sex, style and a happy New Year at Paris’s Crazy Horse

http://f24.my/1Bo0OzD

From France. 24: Priceless wines plundered from Californian restaurant


Priceless wines plundered from Californian restaurant

http://f24.my/1BomZWn

From NPR News: A 40-Day Vegan Fast, Then At Last, A January Christmas Feast


A 40-Day Vegan Fast, Then At Last, A January Christmas Feast http://n.pr/1D39Rr8

From NPR News: WATCH: Full Video Of President Obama’s Interview With NPR


WATCH: Full Video Of President Obama’s Interview With NPR http://n.pr/13KczVS

From NPR News: More States Raise Minimum Wage, But Debate Continues


More States Raise Minimum Wage, But Debate Continues http://n.pr/1wFWk35

From NPR News: Painful Virus Sweeps Central America, Gains A Toehold In U.S.


Painful Virus Sweeps Central America, Gains A Toehold In U.S. http://n.pr/1D5H1Gu

From NPR News: Former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo Dead At 82


Former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo Dead At 82 http://n.pr/1D8ZF05

New home for cocoa quarantine


New home for cocoa quarantine http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30641613

France new year car-burning falls


France new year car-burning falls http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-30653784

Most cancer types ‘just bad luck’


Most cancer types ‘just bad luck’ http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-30641833

Frank Sinatra – This Town


Frank Sinatra – This Town

From NPR News


Pastry With Soul. It’s That Simple http://n.pr/1vJ1I4W

From NPR News


Sen. Marco Rubio Hopes For A Congress ‘Whose Work Is Relevant’ To Americans http://n.pr/13Kk9j3

From NPR News: Sen. Marco Rubio Hopes For A Congress ‘Whose Work Is Relevant’ To Americans


Sen. Marco Rubio Hopes For A Congress ‘Whose Work Is Relevant’ To Americans http://n.pr/13Kk9j3

From BBC:Thomas Piketty rejects France award


Thomas Piketty rejects France award http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-30650097

Syria war ‘killed 76,000’ in 2014


Syria war ‘killed 76,000’ in 2014 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-30648181

Hello World: Happy New Year!


th tjnjknhStop Dismembering insects now!

En Argentina: Hallan hongo que mata al transmisor del dengue y del Chikungunya (Scientists find a fungus that kills the transmitter of dengue and Chikungunya): “Leptolegnia chapmanii”


In Argentina: Hallan fungus that kills the transmitter of dengue and Chikungunya

SALUD | En Argentina

Científicos hallan un hongo que mata al transmisor del dengue y Chikungunya

Un hongo denominado “Leptolegnia chapmanii” puede sobrevivir en aguas turbias o cristalinas de temperaturas variables y es cultivable a bajo costo, por lo que aparece como una prometedora arma para destruir las larvas de los mosquitos transmisores.

EL UNIVERSAL
miércoles 20 de agosto de 2014  04:01 PM

Buenos Aires.- Científicos argentinos hallaron un hongo, adaptable a múltiples hábitat, que destruye las larvas de los mosquitos transmisores del dengue y Chikungunya, dos epidemias virales sin vacunas comerciales y cuyo control se basa en la prevención.

Este hongo, denominado “Leptolegnia chapmanii”, puede sobrevivir en aguas turbias o cristalinas, con distintos PH, a temperaturas variables y es cultivable a bajo costo por lo que aparece como una prometedora arma biológica.

Su poder mortífero probó ser efectivo en larvas de 15 especies de mosquitos, entre ellas las del Aedes Aegypti y Aedes Albopistus, vectores del dengue, una enfermedad viral tropical que puede llegar a ser mortal en su variante hemorrágica y es endémica en muchos países. >>>>>>>>>>more HERE<<<<<<<<<<

Google Translator said:    https://translate.google.com/#auto/en/

HEALTH | In Argentina


Scientists find a fungus that kills the transmitter of dengue and Chikungunya
A fungus called “Leptolegnia chapmaniican survive in cloudy or clear waters of varying temperatures and is cultivated at low cost, so it appears as a promising weapon to destroy the larvae of mosquitoes.
EL UNIVERSAL
Wednesday August 20, 2014 4:01 PM
BUENOS AIRES Argentine scientists have found a fungus, adaptable to multiple habitat, which destroys the larvae of mosquitoes that carry dengue and Chikungunya, two viral epidemics no commercial vaccines and whose control is based on prevention.

This fungus, called “Leptolegnia chapmaniican survive in cloudy or clear waters with varying pH at varying temperatures and is cultivated at low cost so it appears as a promising biological weapon.

Its lethality proved effective in larvae of 15 species of mosquitoes, including Aedes aegypti and Aedes of Albopistus, vectors of dengue, a viral tropical disease that can be fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever and is endemic in many countries.

 

 

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History “History is never OLD: The fleeting moment is…HISTORY!”- George-B


History is never antique: The past moment is...HISTORY!

History is never OLD: The fleeting moment is…HISTORY!

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
January 1

1500   The Portuguese explorer Pedro Alvares Cabral searches the coast of Brazil and claims the region for Portugal.
1586   Sir Francis Drake launches a surprise attack on the heavily fortified city of Santo Domingo in Hipanola.
1698   The Abenaki Indians and Massachusetts colonists sign a treaty halting hostilities between the two.
1766   The Old Pretender, son of James III, dies.
1788   The Times, London’s oldest running newspaper, publishes its first edition.
1808   A U.S. law banning the import of slaves comes into effect, but is widely ignored.
1824   The Camp Street Theatre opens as the first English-language playhouse in New Orleans.
1830   William Lloyd Garrison publishes the first edition of a journal entitled The Liberator, calling for the complete and immediate emancipation of all slaves in the United States.
1863   Confederate General Braxton Bragg and Union General William Rosecrans readjust their troops as the Battle of Murfreesboro continues.
1863   President Abraham Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves in the Confederacy.
1891   Facilities opened on Ellis Island, New York, to cope with the vast flood of immigrants coming into the United States.
1907   The Pure Food and Drug Act becomes law in the United States.
1915   The German submarine U-24 sinks the British battleship Formidable in the English Channel.
1918   The first gasoline pipeline begins operation. Along the 40 miles and three inches of pipe from Salt Creek to Casper, Wyoming.
1923   Sadi Lecointe sets a new aviation speed record flying an average of 208 mph at Istres.
1937   At a party at the Hormel Mansion in Minnesota, a guest wins $100 for naming a new canned meat–Spam.
1945   In Operation Bodenplatte, German planes attack American forward air bases in Europe. This is the last major offensive of the Luftwaffe.
1959   Fidel Castro seizes power in Cuba as General Fulgencio Batista flees.
1986   As the United States builds its strength in the Mediterranean, Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi threatens to retaliate if attacked.
Born on January 1
1735   Paul Revere, U.S. patriot.
1752   Betsy Ross, flag maker.
1879   E.M. [Edward Morgan] Forster, English novelist (A Passage to India, A Room With a View).
1895   J. Edgar Hoover, founding director of the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI).
1919   J.D. [Jerome David] Salinger, U.S. novelist (The Catcher in the Rye, Franny and Zooey).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.ey3JXbrM.dpuf

Art with a Message: Rie Sinclair: Island of Loneliness Great Compositions/voices (Painting by Ilya Repin: Volga Boatmen)


Rie Sinclair Island of Loneliness

Today’s Picture: January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor



On January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor, a new facility for ‘processing’ immigrants. Formerly used as a munitions dump and landfill, Ellis Island was designed, its architects claimed, to handle more than 8,000 newcomers a day. Orderly lines funneled bewildered immigrants past doctors and officials who examined them for signs of disease. The physically and mentally ill were refused admittance, forcing thousands of families to make the difficult decision to return home with a relative refused entry or push on without them. A final brusque interview by an immigration official determined whether the newcomers had already been promised jobs. About 80 percent of those who entered Ellis Island received landing cards permitting them to board ferries for New York City. In the 1890s, 75 percent of all immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.yUdRynY2.dpuf

Saint of the Day for Thursday, January 1st, 2015: Mary the Blessed Virgin


New Year Concert at EUZICASA: Tosca 2001 Ruggero Raimondi, Angela Gheorghiu, Roberto Alagnarg Antonio Pappano in Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca: Great compositions/performances


Giacomom Puccini:  Tosca 2001 Ruggero Raimondi Angela Gheorghiu Roberto Alagnarg Antonio Pappano

today’s holiday: Polar Bear Swim Day (2015)


Polar Bear Swim Day (2015)

Since 1920, a group of hardy swimmers has celebrated New Year’s Day by plunging into the frigid waters of Vancouver’s English Bay. The custom has spread to the US, where chapters of the American Polar Bear Club have established themselves in a number of states known for their cold winter weather. In Sheboygan, Wisconsin, more than 300 daring swimmers brave the ice floes of Lake Michigan to take their New Year’s Day swim. The Sheboygan event has gradually expanded into a day-long festival, with a brat-fry, a costume contest, and live entertainment. More… Discuss

Polar Bear Swim New Years Day 2014 / Salt Spring Island, Canada

Quotation: “I saw a creature, naked, bestial, Who, squatting upon the ground, Held his heart in his hands, And ate of it.” – Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


Quotation of the Day

I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.”Stephen Crane (1871-1900) Discuss

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 

Formal portrait of Stephen Crane taken in Washington, D.C., about March 1896

Stephen Crane (November 1, 1871 – June 5, 1900) was an American author. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation.

The eighth surviving child of Protestant Methodist parents, Crane began writing at the age of four and had published several articles by the age of 16. Having little interest in university studies, he left college in 1891 to work as a reporter and writer. Crane’s first novel was the 1893 Bowery tale Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, generally considered by critics to be the first work of American literary Naturalism. He won international acclaim in 1895 for his Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage, which he wrote without having any battle experience.

In 1896, Crane endured a highly publicized scandal after appearing as a witness in the trial of a suspected prostitute, an acquaintance named Dora Clark. Late that year he accepted an offer to travel to Cuba as a war correspondent. As he waited in Jacksonville, Florida, for passage, he met Cora Taylor, the madam of a brothel, with whom he began a lasting relationship. En route to Cuba, Crane’s ship sank off the coast of Florida, leaving him and others adrift for several days in a dinghy. Crane described the ordeal in “The Open Boat“. During the final years of his life, he covered conflicts in Greece (accompanied by Cora, recognized as the first woman war correspondent) and later lived in England with her. He was befriended by writers such as Joseph Conrad and H. G. Wells. Plagued by financial difficulties and ill health, Crane died of tuberculosis in a Black Forest sanatorium in Germany at the age of 28.

At the time of his death, Crane was considered an important figure in American literature. After he was nearly forgotten for two decades, critics revived interest in his life and work. Crane’s writing is characterized by vivid intensity, distinctive dialects, and irony. Common themes involve fear, spiritual crises and social isolation. Although recognized primarily for The Red Badge of Courage, which has become an American classic, Crane is also known for his poetry, journalism, and short stories such as “The Open Boat”, “The Blue Hotel“, “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky“, and The Monster. His writing made a deep impression on 20th-century writers, most prominent among them Ernest Hemingway, and is thought to have inspired the Modernists and the Imagists.

Crane’s gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery

 

Battle of Chancellorsville by Kurz and Allison; Crane’s realistic portrayal of war has earned him recognition from numerous critics and scholars throughout the years

 

Today’s Birthday: Chiune Sugihara (1900)


Today’s Birthday

Chiune Sugihara (1900)

A Japanese diplomat, Sugihara was sent to Kaunas, Lithuania, in the early days of World War II. There, in direct violation of his orders from Tokyo, the consul began issuing transit visas for fleeing Jews. Without such visas, the refugees would not have been permitted to leave the country. In little over a month, he wrote thousands of visas, continuing even as the train removing him from his consulate post pulled out of the station. How did the Japanese government react to his insubordination? More… Discuss

This Day in History: Frankenstein Is Published (1818)


This Day in History

Frankenstein Is Published (1818)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley‘s Frankenstein, or, the Modern Prometheus is a gothic novel that spawned a new genre of horror stories. It tells the story of Frankenstein, a scientist who discovers how to bring inanimate matter to life and, in the process, creates a man-monster. When Frankenstein fails to provide a mate to satisfy the creature’s human emotions, it seeks revenge. Mary Shelley came up with the idea for the novel while vacationing at the home of what famous poet? More… Discuss

In the News: Stone Age Eats More Than Just Meats


In the News

Stone Age Eats More Than Just Meats

Resolving to go on the Paleo diet in 2015? You may want to rethink what the ancients really ate. The trendy diet calls for people to avoid carbohydrates—including beans and grains—in favor of meat, poultry, and fish, but a recent study suggests that this diet is more limiting than ones actually adhered to in the Paleolithic era. Researchers studying hominid diets from that time period have found them to be quite varied and based on whatever food was available, which, in the case of hunter-gatherers near the equator, was plants—not meat. More… Discuss

Article of the Day: Ticker-Tape Parades


Article of the Day

Ticker-Tape Parades

Ticker-tape parades were originated in New York City by Grover Whalen, the city’s official greeter from 1919 to 1953. The welcome ceremonies he staged for Charles Lindbergh and returning soldiers from both world wars, among others, featured a festive snow of confetti—originally ticker-tape from stockbrokers’ offices in lower Manhattan—thrown onto the parade from the tall buildings along the route. Today the parades most often fete sports champions. What is the “Canyon of Heroes“? More… Discuss

word: squalor


squalor

Definition: (noun) A filthy and wretched condition or quality.
Synonyms: sordidness, squalidness
Usage: The squalor in which the refugees lived alarmed the aid workers, who knew they had to work quickly to improve these conditions. Discuss.


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From BBC: Thatcher considered adverts on BBC


Thatcher considered adverts on BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-30622889

From BBC: India scheme to monitor toilet use


India scheme to monitor toilet use http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-30647504

From BBC: Rail firms must offer cheapest ticket


Rail firms must offer cheapest ticket http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30649551

From BBC: Putin inspires fashion label


Putin inspires fashion label http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-30642438

Tunisia leader pledges reconciliation


Tunisia leader pledges reconciliation http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-30639792

From BBC: Woman held over Syria terror offences


Woman held over Syria terror offences http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30642210

From BBC: Experimental drug for UK Ebola nurse


Experimental drug for UK Ebola nurse http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30644986

From BBC: New rules for healthy school dinners (In England)


New rules for healthy school dinners http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-30644523

Hundreds rescued from migrant ship


Hundreds rescued from migrant ship http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-30643368

North Korean leader proposes talks


North Korean leader proposes talks http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-30647442